The Prohibition Of The 18th Amendment Essay

The Prohibition Of The 18th Amendment Essay

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Imagine a strange man is recklessly driving on the freeway late at night. The police began to chase him down. They tell him to get out, and they start to test his basic motor skills, mental ability, and his breath for signs of intoxication. He fails this test and is arrested for drunk driving. What is the catalyst responsible for his apprehension; is it his poor choices or is it the alcohol he drank? Obviously, it is the alcohol followed by his choice to drink and drive which inhibited necessary basic skills that got him arrested. The usage of alcohol was a controversial issue a century ago after a religious movement which led to the passage of the 18th Amendment, banning the usage of alcoholic beverages. This period, called the Prohibition Era by many, occurred for many reasons which impacted the US for decades.
Some causes for the ratification of the 18th Amendment were a moral issue, women’s suffrage, and discrimination. The main driving force of prohibition was the religious revival which called for temperance. Several religious groups believed that abstinence from alcohol in the US would lower crime, domestic violence, and create a more religious society. Women played a pivotal role in the temperance movement. They believed that prohibition could allow for people to maintain a civilized lifestyle. The temperance groups and the women’s suffrage groups became allied to pass the 18th Amendment. Due to the racial climate at the time, discrimination against many groups was prevalent including immigrants. Most people believed that immigrants were morally corrupt, resulting in the want for America to get back to its roots of not consuming alcohol. Due to these factors mentioned and other minor factors, the country ratified the 18th...


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...e gained as a result of taxation on alcoholic beverages. Although the barring of alcohol was arguably a good idea, failed enforcement and little long-term, after the 18th Amendment’s ratification, support made Prohibition a detriment to the US economy and the country in general.
The Prohibition Era was a bizarre period in the US. It occurred primarily due to a religious revival in the early 20th century. This led to many consequences, namely a loss of US revenue and a rise in organized crime. This era was important to American history because it shows that the government cannot stop people from drinking alcohol and that the government has limitations. Furthermore, the period brought to light the declining morality and of Americans and a more secular America. Despite how pleasant the idea of alcohol banned sounds, truly it was more of a menace to the US than helpful.

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