Essay on Influence Of Jazz On The Genre Of Blues And Ragtime

Essay on Influence Of Jazz On The Genre Of Blues And Ragtime

Length: 1234 words (3.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Contributions to Jazz
Jazz, being art itself, cannot be culturally or stylistically be defined by one or two characteristics. In this paper, I will argue that the development of jazz was mainly contributed by the genre of blues and ragtime. Blue and ragtime both show characteristics that contrast each other as well as conjoin to form the art of jazz. Both genres, however, contribute to the formation of jazz and are culturally influenced by the African-American population, therefore creating black nationalism in the twentieth century. ​
​Blues are known to be sorrow songs created by slave workers from the South (New Orleans). Although most songs in the genre blues are sorrow, blues was created by slaves to ease their suffering. Slaves found blues to be expressive for them and they were able to release their anger, frustration, pain, sorrow, and hatred through the art of music; this genre is also known as the “cries of the people.” Blues are known to have “Afro-American folk sources,” which as we know, are also known as slaves.
In 1941, the autobiography, “Father of the Blues,” was published. The “Father of the Blues,” was told to be William Christopher Hardy, he noticed all of the characteristics that contributed to blues and formed his own band. W.C Hardy composed and published himself one of the first blues songs called, “Memphis Blues.” This song was primarily popular and important to jazz history because incorporated the characteristics of a blues song along with tango rhythm.
Blues songs were mainly created with a guitar and vocals that usually included words with double meanings. The art of blues was known to micrtonality for its pureness. Blues was mainly popular for its art of syncopation. Blues musicians syncopated by miss...


... middle of paper ...


...ifference made ragtime have the uplifting swing feel versus the sorrow blues form.
Nowadays, the art of jazz relies solely on improvisation and is not composed at all, so the genre of jazz received this characteristic from the genre blues. Jazz received the characteristic of the “swing feel” from the genre ragtime because they were known to have the “hot rhythm.” Jazz was greatly contributed by both genres: ragtime and blues, in different ways. Jazz, although has evolved culturally, was primarily created by the African-American culture and still promotes black nationalism. The history of both genres dates back to the South and Midwest where the culture was heavily populated and heavily influential to the art of jazz. The art of jazz relies on the contribution of not only these two genres but many more and therefore can not be defined by only a couple characteristics.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Emergence Of Jazz And Ragtime Essay

- The Emergence of Jazz was the result of varying musical styles that were established due to an especially high intensity of musical activity in New Orleans during the 1800s, originally for the entertainment of social dancers. Two primary genres of music that played an essential role in contributing to what is known as Jazz, include “blues” and “ragtime”, these genres of music both carried imperative value in the creation of Jazz, however, each has its own set of normality’s that distinguish one from the other....   [tags: Jazz, Blues, Music genre, Ragtime]

Strong Essays
1298 words (3.7 pages)

Jazz Music : Blues And Ragtime Essay

- The evolvement of jazz throughout the years has been an interesting one. Blues and Ragtime are just two simple innovations that has allowed for many variations in the jazz genre. Both of these genres have their similarities and differences in how they influenced jazz music through: improvisation, syncopation, and experimentation. Ragtime and Blues are different in that they originated from different places. Blues developed in the south. Blues is mainly a vocal music. It was emotional, in that the earliest form was singing and hand clapping....   [tags: Jazz, Blues, Music, Jelly Roll Morton]

Strong Essays
763 words (2.2 pages)

The Between Blues And Jazz Essay

- The interaction between Blues and Jazz can be discerned when the origins of both music are scrutinized. The development of one is hidden in the roots of one another and both use similar sound patterns for instance. In this paper the readers will be presented a brief history of Blues & Jazz within the similarities of the two. If we trace back to the history of Blues music, the impact of African-American tradition is seen quite apparently. Blues music evolved from the songs sung by West African griots, the southern Black American songs of sadness and despair, and more hopeful Christian spirituals....   [tags: Jazz, Blues, African American culture, Rock music]

Strong Essays
753 words (2.2 pages)

Essay about The Genesis Of Jazz One

- To understand the genesis of Jazz one must also understand the setting of its origin, New Orleans. The city was founded by the French in 1718, then in 1763 the city ceded to Spain and remained under Spanish control until later being returned to the French in 1803, and then was immediately sold to the United States under the Louisiana Purchase. New Orleans was also heavily populated by African slaves making up 30% of the total population of the city at this time; so New Orleans was experiencing a lot of cultural diversity and was being shaped and molded by the many different fashions of people who lived in the city....   [tags: Jazz, Blues, Music, African American]

Strong Essays
1811 words (5.2 pages)

Jazz During The Harlem Renaissance Essay

- Jazz during the Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance was a major artistic movement in the early Twentieth Century. The movement impacted all types of art including music, paintings, and literature and even influenced the cultural setting to an extent. The Harlem Renaissance was an artistic revolution that took place in the 1920s where African American artists, writers, philosophers and artists sought to foster a rich black culture within the great melting pot of America. Alain Lock promoted a trend, which led to more political aggressiveness, and a self-confident perspective of identity and racial delight prompted the establishment of the idea of the “new negro.” (1) Also during the 1...   [tags: Jazz, Blues, Swing music, Duke Ellington]

Strong Essays
1367 words (3.9 pages)

Jazz : A Musical Genre Essay

- Jazz Jazz is a musical genre born in the second half of the nineteenth century in the United States, which expanded globally over the twentieth century. The genre developed in embryo from the traditions of West Africa, Europe and North America found their pot in the African American community living in the southern United States. In the words of folklorist and ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax, jazz is a musical gumbo, a result of the melting pot, the melting pot that was the southern country. Geographically, jazz emerged in the state of Louisiana, specifically in the area of influence of New Orleans (home of jazz musical style and main center during the early days of jazz), where large shipmen...   [tags: African American, Jazz, Southern United States]

Strong Essays
1266 words (3.6 pages)

Essay about History and Legacy of Jazz Music

- In the 1920s, through the streets of New Orleans, a familiar sound could be heard escaping from the walls of the night clubs. The sultry saxophone solos and the strange scatting selections filled the air. The style was new and spontaneous. This new genre incorporated the styles from gospel hymns, blues, and ragtime, yet was completely different in its own way. The sound, with its new techniques that gave it a raw uniqueness, was able to capture America's curiousness, and make many fall head over heels for the new infectious sound....   [tags: Music Genre, New Orleans]

Strong Essays
988 words (2.8 pages)

Jazz Music And Its Influences Essay

- Jazz is one of the only uniquely American forms of music. Its roots date back all the way to the Atlantic slave trade. Jazz is still alive and well today. This paper will walk you through Jazz’s rich history. We’ll start with the basics of African music and its influences. Then we will take you through the decades leading to modern Jazz. In the early 19th century, the Atlantic slave trade had brought close to five hundred thousand African slaves to the United States. The slaves had brought ingrained musical traditions with them....   [tags: Jazz, Miles Davis, Blues, Duke Ellington]

Strong Essays
1891 words (5.4 pages)

The Origins Of Jazz Music Essay

- This essay, as the title suggests, will be about the origins of jazz music. Starting from the roots when African slaves arrived in North America, they helped the development and the emergence of early jazz a great deal. It is also important to not forget the significance of the Congo Square which kept the music alive in New Orleans, never letting it die out. Then, continuing on with the slavery theme, the essay will talk about why and how jazz music appeared in its widely considered birth place, New Orleans....   [tags: Jazz, Blues, Louis Armstrong, New Orleans]

Strong Essays
1242 words (3.5 pages)

Essay on Ragtime

- Ragtime was a very influential part of the development of jazz. Ragtime became very popular in the late 1800’s. Ragtime’s distinct style set it apart from the other genres. Syncopation is what defines this art form. This is when the loud accents fall in between the beats. Anything that is syncopated is basically ragtime. One of the most important ragtime composers was Scott Joplin. Like all great artists, Joplin did not restrict himself to this favored art form. Both before the advent of ragtime and after, Joplin composed marches and waltzes, including the syncopated waltzes....   [tags: essays research papers]

Strong Essays
861 words (2.5 pages)