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The Sanity within The Cask of Amontillado

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The Sanity within The Cask of Amontillado

Is Montressor sane? In the story by Edgar Allen Poe, "The Cask of

Amontillado," the narrator, Montressor premeditates the murder of

Fortunato from vowing revenge to having the tools in the catacombs

ready and waiting. When Montressor and Fortunato reach the end of the

catacombs, Montressor continues with his plan and walls Fortunato into

the catacombs returning the previous skeleton to its rightful place.

At the end of the story, Montressor feels guilty as he tells the story

of what happened fifty years prior and tells Fortunato to rest in

peace. By vowing revenge, methodically planning and following through

with such a meticulous plan, and the feelings of guilt and remorse

fifty years after the fact, Montressor shows that he planned the

murder step by step, and proves that he is sane.

Montressor premeditates the murder from vowing revenge to having the

tools in the catacombs ready and waiting. Montressor vows revenge, but

not just revenge, he vows that at length he will be avenged.

Montressor states, "That neither by word nor deed had I given

Fortunato cause to doubt my good-will (Poe 563)." Montressor shows

with this statement that he has the capability of knowing what he has

premeditated is wrong. Montressor waits to get revenge during the

madness of the carnival, a time when it is likely neither will be

missed from the festivities. When Montressor meets Fortunato in the

palazzo, he tells of the Amontillado he has received, and that he has

his doubts on the genuineness. Montressor knows that Fortunato is a

wine connoisseur and will be intrigued at the thought of Amontillado

being so near. Montressor tells Fortunato that since he is otherwise

engaged in the ...

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...n. "The Cask of Amontillado." Literature: An

Introduction to Readingand Writing. Ed. Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E.

Jacobs. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2001. 563-7

Reynolds, David S. "Sources and Analogues of 'The Cask of

Amontillado.'" From "Poe's Art of Transformation: 'The Cask of

Amontillado' in Its Cultural Context." New Essays on Poe's Major

Tales. Ed. Kenneth Silverman. New York: Cambridge, 1993. 93-112 Rpt.

Literature: An Introduction to Readingand Writing. Ed. Edgar V.

Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall,

2001. 575-81

Thompson, G.R. "The Narrator of 'The Cask of Amontillado' and 'The

Fall of the House of Usher'." Great Short Works of Edgar Allan Poe

(1970) Rpt. in Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing. Ed.

Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs. Upper Saddle River: Prentice

Hall, 2001. 568-9.
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