The Importance Of Contingency Management

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Unfortunately, due to lack of maturity and an impulsive nature, many people start experimenting in the adolescent years. According to Johnston, O’Malley, & Schulenberg (as cited in National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2014), “by the time they are seniors, almost 70 percent of high school students will have tried alcohol, half will have taken an illegal drug, nearly 40 percent will have smoked a cigarette, and more than 20 percent will have used a prescription drug for a nonmedical purpose” (p. 8). The pubescence years are a time of significant physical, psychological, social, emotional, and intellectual development. Drug use during this period can increase the risk for problems with knowledge, attention, memory, judgment, and behavior, as well…show more content…
According to Ylvisaker, Feeney & Hibbard (2007), CM is based on the principle that behavior is a function of consequences. It is the belief that following this conditioning model, the adolescent’s drug habit will diminish when tangible incentives are given for abstinence from their drug use. Contingency management can be offered in a variety of locations and parents can be taught these methods to implement at…show more content…
“There are a variety of family therapy approaches… including structural family approaches, multifamily therapy, and behavioral approaches” (Buckstein, 2004, p. 168). Family therapy should not involve only parents of the adolescent, but any siblings, as well. According to NIH (2014), family counseling is more effective than group or individual therapy. According to U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2009), family behavior therapy has exhibited positive results for both adolescents and adults; this approach has similar components of contingency management except therapy is completed with a family member rather than individually that will select precise interventions from a list of treatment options. The therapy teaches new skills to decrease urges to use drugs, communication skills, and skills associated with getting a job or attending school in a normal social setting that does not include substance
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