The Great Gatsby And The Sun Analysis

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In the novels, The Great Gatsby, and the Sun also Rises, the two protagonists Jay Gatz, and Jake Barnes respectively exemplify the struggles of post war life and the battle of the old world class system in their pursuit of the corrupted American dream. Although they may seem different in circumstance, a Midwestern boy climbing the social ladder of America, and an expatriate news correspondent they could not be more alike. Gertrude Stein eloquently surmises their brother hood in arms of post war America as “You are all a lost generation” This brotherhood extends to the inability to consummate the love they have for the women in their lives, the struggle of climbing the socioeconomic ladder of the 1930s, and leaving their “friend” to reminisce…show more content…
The love they have for Brett and Daisy in both novels, “Sex is pervasive as well as essential” (Puckett). Mutually they could have ample opportunity with other women, but there drive of their loves is there fetal flaw. Bill Gorton, points the drive of life being sex at the banks of the river during the fishing trip. Jake’s love begins with a nurse in the hospital, in which Jake belongs in due to his injury that has left him forever impotent, “giving more than his life” (Hemingway). He is taunted almost daily by the proximity to his love. Gatsby, on the other hand, became situationally impotent due to the war taking him away from daisy for years and she married Tom. Gatsby was at least able to consummate his love first “on a still October night” and later throughout the novel once he “met” Daisy again who could hardly remember him. The time that had past drove Daisy further away from Gatsby, thus wounded twice by the war. The sun may be able to rise but Jake and Gatsby have lost this privilege due to the war. The idea of prostitution is present in both as well. Both Daisy and Brett grow up in the higher class lifestyle of the bourgeoisie that Jake and Gatsby both strive to achieve. They marry into love and money seems to drive their love. It could be said that they are incapable of love. They only love the image and wealth it provides “The bourgeoisie [have]…show more content…
About her daughter. In the first few chapters of the Sun also Rises Georgette is introduced, a cheap prostitute is looked down upon, but the comparison is made to Brett in her gold digging activities. Jake uses his meager wealth in attempt to impress Brett by leaving it for Georgette to which Brett replies, “You’re going to lose your fifty francs,” (Hemingway) Puckett’s analysis of this scene “Jake’s choice of a prostitute to display his wealth functions, further-more, as a way for him to … suggest his virility” (Puckett). This “strutting” continues with Gatsby taking a display of wealth to a far larger degree in his purchase of his mansion with elegant and excessive parties. This drive to show wealth based on the new found materialism in America is shown through both
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