Social Constraints Placed Upon Women

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Think about the men and women in everyday life and compare their actual successes to their aptitudes, drives, and intelligences that would theoretically enable them to achieve success. Excluding factors such as differing social backgrounds and upbringings, it does not seem that an ‘aptly prepared’, ‘decently intelligent’, or ‘hard-working’ sort of woman will always achieve in the real world. No, many females are deterred from scholastic and professional achievement by social expectations, many of which are outdated because they are ‘standards’ that have been set too low.

When asked about what they wanted to be when they grew up, many of my female classmates responded that they would like to be stay-home-at-home moms. I was puzzled. I believe that women and men are fundamentally the same and that it is just the social constraints that put limits on what women “can” and “cannot” do. Really and truly, they can do anything and everything, but it is just a question of whether it is socially acceptable or not. This scenario is really no different from when a mathematically gifted person asserts all the reasons why he or she could not be simultaneously adept at both math and literature, and vice versa. Some exceptional human beings, like the polymath Leonardo DaVinci, decided to pay these social expectations no heed. If these limits were removed by disregarding what society expects, then real progress could be made since there would be infinite possibilities of favorable outcomes. Sure, it is true that generally speaking, there are a few psychological differences between men and women, but those differences are slight and insignificant. It is generally true that men speak to help people or to fix problems while women speak to form soci...

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...ss than wholesome: girls are still looking up to people such as Miley Cyrus, Vanessa Hudgens, or even Jamie Lynn Spears. While these people have their good attributes, such as talent for entertaining the public, agreeable social skills, etc., their reputations have been marred by scandals that are definitely not a thing that young women need to aspire to. They should, instead, aspire to women with true talent, compassion, determination, and innovation. They need to look up to strong, independent women like Alice Paul, Barbara McClintock, Elizabeth Blackwell, Helen Keller, Marie Curie, Oprah Winfrey, Rosa Parks, Susan B. Anthony, and others who were true pioneers in their respective fields because they were not afraid to surpass the social constraints that had bound their predecessors. Young women will achieve as much or even more as men when these standards are met.
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