Salem Witch Trials Dbq Essay

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Question 1: The evidence presented against the supposed witches during the Salem Witch Trials was not physical evidence. Most of the testimonies given by the townspeople were random happenstances that were told to make the accused seem guilty. Other types of evidence given were statements about the accusers being bitten and pinched; this apparently classified as bewitching someone. Some of the accused claimed to be conspiring with the devil so they would not be executed and instead be put in prison (Godbeer 143). Many years later statements given by testifiers were recanted, jurors apologized, and the families of the executed were given compensation for their loss. Take the case of Sarah Good, who was first arrested on February 29,1692…show more content…
Legally, the idea of accusing witches disappeared worldwide because there is not enough factual evidence to prove that someone is a witch in a courtroom. Many of the people executed during the witch hunt names were reversed in the eyes of the church in light of this idea (Document 94). The belief in witchcraft and witches still continued, and in 1787 a woman was killed for suspected witchcraft in Philadelphia (Godbeer 30). In Document 95 John Hale discusses the idea of witchcraft and how it is discussed int he bible. He states, “This of witchcraft is one of the most difficult to be searched out by the sons of men, as appeareth by great endeavors of learned and holy men to search it out”. Hale goes on to say that it is impossible to discover a witch because the works of them and the Devil are so secret and only the Lord can fins witches and punish them(Document 95). This document supported the idea that witches could not be taken to court and that only God could do something about witchcraft. The puritans from this point slowly began to forget about the idea of…show more content…
She was referred to as “Tituba Indian” by Elizabeth Hubbard on March 1, 1962 (Document 30). Ann Putnam referred to her a “Mr.Parris’s Indian woman” in her deposition (Document 31). Puritans believed that the Indians praised the Devil because of misunderstandings in culture (Godbeer 82) This also put her at risk because many people in the village did not believe she was a Christian because of her native descent. The four girls most likely accused her of witchcraft because she looked different and did not conform to their Puritan culture. Another reason Tituba’s could have been accused of witchcraft is because of her stature. She was Samuel Parris’s slave. He was the minister in town and he had lots of influence in the community. If he realized his daughter was lying about her accusations, he could have forced Tituba to admit to conspiring with the
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