Paradise Lost Analysis

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Milton continues to be considered as one of the best poets, and his best known poem, Paradise Lost, continues to be tricky for his readers to identify exactly who is and who is not the hero between the three prominent characters: Satan, the Son of God, and Adam. Born in London, England in the early seventeenth century, Milton grew up to be a widely respected and known poet and a considerable political proponent (“John Milton”). Growing up, he excelled in his schooling and frequently attended church services. At the age of seventeen, Milton continued his education at Christ’s College located in Cambridge, England. After some consideration, he fully decided writing poetry would be what he would do for the rest of his life. During the time when…show more content…
In the majority of well-known and commonly studied known epics, the hero can be easily determined; however, in Paradise Lost, figuring out who the hero is can be quite the challenge (Luxon and Moe). Luxon and Miller take highly influential quote from C.S. Lewis’s A Preface to Paradise Lost mentioning a very important point one should consider when reading and analyzing works; Lewis states, “Every poem can be considered in two ways—as what the poet has to say, and as a thing which he makes.” (Luxon and Miller). Another critic of Milton, Addison,…show more content…
The primary issue with Adam being considered the hero of Paradise Lost is that he fails to have a heroic act; rather, his actions lead to the fall of man and are filled with disobedience which is contrary to a trait of an epic hero. Therefore, if Milton intentionally meant for Adam to be the hero of his epic-like poem instead of Satan, he goes against the basic requirements for a hero which has been set in place before him (Luxon and
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