Martin Luther King's Letter From A Birmingham Jail

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Letter from a Birmingham Jail Analysis It takes courage to dedicate a life to trying to make a difference in a society where people believe their ways will never change. Martin Luther King was one of the very few national idols of social movement which used the power of voice and faith to motivate millions. In,”Letter from a Birmingham Jail [King, Jr.]” he addressed the clergymen about racial discrimination the country was facing and how we should find peace without resorting to violence. Through MLK’s use of Ethos,Pathos,Logos he was able to argue about the nonviolent resistance movement towards racism. When using pathos, MLK set such a poetic tone, giving emotional loaded language as well as building a more emotional connection with the reader.…show more content…
He adds, “One has not only a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that, “an unjust law is no law at all.” We can see here how he refers to St. Augustine for a historic point of view. Another example is when he talks about condemning Socrates and Jesus. “Isn’t this like condemning Socrates because his unswerving commitment to truth and his philosophical inquiries precipitated the act by the misguided populace in which they made him drink hemlock? Isn’t this like condemning Jesus because his unique God consciousness and never ceasing devotion to God’s will precipitated the evil act of crucifixion?” MLK uses these two examples to state that the, “federal courts have consistently affirmed,” and that it is unjust to take away someone 's basic constitutional rights just because of what they believe in. This helps his argument in such a way that provides evidence from the past to back up his…show more content…
He speaks of segregation, “Jewish philosopher Martin Buber, substitutes an [I it] relationship for an [I thou] relationship and ends up regulating persons to the status of things,” giving credibility to a well educated man who helps support his clause. Same goes for when he talks about Meshach and abednego from Nebuchadnezzar about the acts of civil disobedience. He shows his characterwhen giving an example about what,” Hitler did in Germany was [legal] and everything the Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was [illegal]. It was [illegal] to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler’s Germany. Even so, I am sure that, had I lived in Germany at the time, I would have aided and comforted my Jewish brothers.” And “If today I lived in a Communist country where certain principles dear to the Christian faith are suppressed, I would openly advocate disobeying that country 's antireligious laws.” Telling his audience he would voluntarily go against his own country’s laws for the common good shows how right and just this man is and that all he wants is justice and equality for his
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