Literary Analysis Of Charles Perrault's Little Red Riding Hood

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The fairytale Little Red Riding Hood by Charles Perrault is a story that recounts the adventure of the protagonist Little Red Riding Hood as she fulfills her mother’s wishes to bring a package to her ill grandmother. Perrault’s short story conveys influential life themes on the idea of male predation on adolescent women who fall victim to male deception. Perrault successfully portrays these themes through his use of rhetorical devices such as personifying the actions of the antagonist Wolf predator as he preys on the protagonist Little Red. Perrault illuminates the central theme of upholding sexual purity and being aware of eminent threats in society in his work. Roald Dahl’s poem, Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf, is an adaptation to…show more content…
The first significant difference is in the plot of Roald Dahl’s poem. Taken out completely is the Wolf encounter with Little Red Riding Hood in the woods. Instead of the Wolf cunningly getting information on the whereabouts of grandmother’s house from Little Red Riding Hood, in Dahl’s poem the “Wolf began to feel / That he would like a decent meal, / He went and knocked on Grandma’s door” (Dahl Lines 1-3). The first couple of lines in Dahl’s poem don’t begin focusing on Little Red Riding Hood the way Perrault’s short story does, but instead these lines aim the attention of the poem on the Wolf by beginning with his primary actions and feelings. Along with this absence of plot and shift in focus, Roald Dahl deviates from Perrault’s short story again during Little Red Riding Hood’s encounter with the Wolf in grandmother’s house. Roald Dahl includes the beginning dialogue of questioning between Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf that was originally present in Perrault’s work. However, as this repetition of dialogue goes on, there are significant differences in Roald Dahl’s poem. Instead of carrying on the same questioning dialogue, Little Red Riding Hood says, “but Grandma, / what a lovely great big furry coat you have on” (Dahl Line 39), to then what Dahl answers, “That’s…show more content…
Little Red Riding Hood can be seen as taking the role of the Wolf. Unlike Perrault’s short story where Little Red Riding Hood has a purpose for going to grandmother’s house, she does not have any such purpose in Roald Dahl’s poem. Little Red Riding Hood can be interpreted as a villain in Roald Dahl’s poem for the fact that the situation is inverted and Little Red Riding Hood commits the treacherous act of killing. This too plays along with the aforementioned idea of the Wolf not being entirely seen as a villain in Roald Dahl’s
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