Fortunato Misfortunes In The Cask Of Amontillado Analysis

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Fortunato’s Misfortunes in “A Cask of Amontillado” In Edgar Allen Poe’s short story “A Cask of Amontillado” the diabolical narrator, Montresor, has only one goal in mind. He seeks to get revenge on his “friend” Fortunato. Montresor composes a plan use Fortunato’s ego to ironically lead him to his death. Fortunato is supposedly a wine expert; however, this expertise will ultimately equip Montresor in his plan to kill him. Poe’s dark short story is filled with irony. “A Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allen Poe has irony in almost every line of the story and shows that Fortunato’s misfortunes ultimately lead him to his death. Poe uses irony in “A Cask of Amontillado” before the story even starts within the title. The word “cask” is meant…show more content…
When Montresor is asking Fortunato to come and taste the wine, he appears as if he is concerned for Montresor’s health. Montresor says, “My friend, no. It is not the engagement, but the severe cold with which I perceive you are afflicted. The vaults are insufferably damp. They are encrusted with nitre” (Poe 393). The reader knows that it would not make sense for Montresor to actually be concerned about Fortunato’s health when his end goal is to kill him. Montresor is playing to Fortunato’s ego, and he knows that Fortunato will think that he is the only one who will be able to identify the wine. Montresor uses this tactic all throughout their journey down the catacombs. “We will go back; your health is precious. You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible” (Poe 393). Montresor is complimenting Fortunanto and playing to his ego. He knows Fortunato will not agree to turning back. He tells Forunanto that he is a man to be missed and that he cannot be responsible for his illness; however, the reader knows that Montresor is going to be responsible for his death. “A Cask of Amontillado” is filled with dramatic irony, and the reader knows what Montresor says is…show more content…
While traveling through the catacombs, Fortunato does a gesture to see if Montresor recognizes the symbols of the brotherhood of the masons. Montresor does not recognize it; however, he continues to tell Fortunato that he indeed is a mason. When Fortunato asks for a sign Montresor shows him a trowel which is used by brick masons. Fortunato thinks it is a joke, but he has no clue that Montresor will later be using that trowel to brick him into his own grave. Also verbal irony is when Fortunato drinks the wine and says, “I drink to the buried that repose around us”, and Montresor replies “and I to your long life” (Poe 394). Fortunato is drinking to the dead people around him, but he does not know that soon he himself will be among the dead. Montresor drinks to Fortunato’s long life; however, he knows Fortunato’s life is going to end shortly. Poe uses verbal irony all throughout “A Cask of Amontillado”. In Edgar Allen Poe’s gothic short story “A Cask of Amontillado” irony is used throughout the entire plot. The untrustworthy narrator is only out for revenge, and uses irony to trick his friend into trusting him. Fortunato is anything but fortunate in this short story, and the use of irony in almost every element of the story creates a suspenseful tale for the
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