Charles Dickens' Great Expectations

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Charles Dickens' Great Expectations In chapter eight Dickens begins with a detailed description of Satis House, we are given a vivid idea of what is in store for Pip right from the beginning. The language and phrases used emphasise the darkness and forbidding nature of the house. When Pip first enters the house he describes it as having, 'old bricks, and dismal, and had a great many iron bars to it. Some of the windows had been walled up; of those that remained, all the lower were rustily barred'. This adds to the atmosphere of darkness, because all the 'windows had been walled up'. In addition, there is a feeling of old age and this is portrayed when Dickens talks about the windows being 'rustily barred' and how the house was made from 'old bricks'. The mood is created by the portrayal of the dull, dusky and dispirited house. This is emphasised even more when Estella tells Pip about 'Satis House' meaning 'Enough House'. This could have two implications; one meaning is that the house is enough to satisfy anyone. Towards the end of the chapter, the reader will find that this is not the meaning that is being portrayed. The more sensible and relative meaning is everyone has had enough of the house and of life itself, this is more related to Miss Havisham. In addition, Pip has had enough of the house, because after being there for a little while he wants to go home. Inside the house, a feeling of death and darkness is revealed and we get the feeling that nothing is as it seems. This is shown by Pip's description of the house, for example Pip says, 'the cold wind seemed to be colder there, than outside the gate'. Satis House is also seen as a Prison through Pip's eyes because he talks about the windows... ... middle of paper ... ...ip has to leave the room, because the surroundings are to daunting for him. This tells us that Jaggers has no remorse for those that have died and once again is heartless, but also brave for being able to live in such peculiar and unnatural atmospheres. To conclude everything, Dickens creates a sense of dirt and filth through out London; He does this by describing the surroundings in immense detail using effective language. However, the main reason why the image is portrayed very effectively is the change of setting, from the quiet countryside to the busy city streets. A lot is emphasised on the relationship between character and setting, so it should be no surprise when Pip encounters objects of punishment and Justice everywhere he looks at Jaggers' work. Overall, the images of death are conjured up to indicate Mr Jaggers has power over life and death.

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