Art As a Shared Experience

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Art, even in its simplest form, has a culture embedded on it. It cannot be separated from the artist’s way of life. It differentiates a culture from all the rest and defines itself to an extent where nobody but the artist can even grasp. Traces of art forms have been identified alongside the evolution of mankind and flourished since the establishment of civilizations. These earlier art masterpieces in the form of sculptures, cave paintings, petroglyphs and the like were found from different parts of the world. These represented the perception of the people in the ancient times about their way of life and so despite its uniqueness in form, the similarities in these perceptions became the binding thread that connected every culture to the other thereby making art a shared experience. The concept of art is hard to define; not because it is vague or abstract, but because it has had many different reasons for being created. It takes us to a journey to the past, the present and the future. It may reveal a community’s way of life, a person’s imagination, or merely a form of entertainment. It must be taken into consideration that art is culture-bound, something that is in a person’s field of experience. This paper aims to show that art is a shared experience by the artist, the artwork itself and the viewers of it. By looking at two different paintings, created in different times, of artists having different backgrounds, the paper intends to provide an understanding of how art threads time and links all cultures abound. (Figure 1) – The Cutting Scene, Mandan O-kee-pa Ceremony by George Catlin Medium: Oil paint on canvass The Cutting Scene, Mandan O-kee-pa Ceremony, an oil canvas painting by George Cat... ... middle of paper ... ... look at it hence explaining the inter-connectedness of people regardless of race and culture. In conclusion, it is still within the viewers’ openness that they will truly appreciate the beauty and find the importance of art to mankind. Works Cited Catlin Virtual Exhibition. George Catlin and his Indian Gallery. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://americanart.si.edu/catlin/highlights.html. Eanger Irving Couse. Saginaw Images. December 2000. Retrieved from http://www.saginawimages.org/essay.asp?ItemID=SMES0005. E. Irving Couse,(1866 1936). Fine Old Art. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.fineoldart.com/browse_by_essay.html?essay=230. George Catlin. Indeginous Peoples’ Literature. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.indians.org/welker/catlin.htm. Who is George Catlin. Essortment. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.essortment.com/george-catlin-63651.html.
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