Analysis Of The Movie Shutter Island

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Shutter Island From Novel to Film Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island is a brilliant movie which is adapted from the equally brilliant novel by Dennis Lehane. After experiencing an emotional connection to the book, Scorsese set to work on creating this masterpiece starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Upon its release, Shutter Island had every range of reaction; it completely split both critics and fans. Scorsese’s representation of Teddy Daniels (the main character), and Dr. Cawley are very thorough and only the slightest bit liberal with hardly anything missing or added. The overall tone or mood of the film is fairly different than the feelings I got while reading the book. Scorsese presents a far more fear-driven, spooky mood to the film. Lehane, on…show more content…
Scorsese stated in an interview, “I felt empathetic for the character, overwhelmed by the nature of the story.” (Wong). Scorsese has often been hailed as the greatest living American movie directer, and has been in the film making industry for over forty years. He describes the process of translating the mood he experienced in himself to the big screen as constantly having to “choose, select, emphasize certain visual elements and sound.” (Wong). Scorsese recalls that he turned to a few other select films for inspiration and reference while creating Shutter Island. These films include Samuel Fuller’s Shock Corridor from 1963, Otto Preminger’s Laura from 1944, and Jacques Tourneur’s Out of the Past from 1947 (Wong). Initial reviews on this thriller were completely split. Some critics and fans were amazed, while others felt downright offended. Roger Ebert falls into the first category. In his 2010 movie review he commends the effectiveness of the thriller referring to it’s careful thoughtfulness beginning with the very first musical notes which accompany the opening credits. Ebert beautifully compares Shutter Island to film noir with its similarities including a flawed hero, and characters with baggage. He complies that it may take a person multiple views to appreciate the ending, but then argues that such a quality is part of what makes Shutter Island such a master piece. A.O. Scott of the New York Times is…show more content…
We get the sense that he is not in control of his surroundings, beginning with his lack of control of his own body (as he is throwing up from sea sickness on the ferry). Even as Teddy is speaking with his partner, Chuck Aule, he seems insecure in his facial expressions as he frequently is looking down. Upon my initial reading of Dennis Lehane’s novel I wasn’t presented with any of these notions. Although Teddy is still throwing up from sea sickness, and speaking with his partner for the first time, Lehane illustrates him as a much more nonchalant, confident person. On page 13, in chapter one, we read the first conversation between Teddy and Chuck: “You okay?” Chuck asked. “You look
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