Analysis Of Sylvia Plath's 'Ariel'

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Ariel: Anxiety For Freedom Sylvia Plath's poems are so intervened with her life that it is difficult to separate them. Her poems, she said in an interview she gave to Peter Orr in October 1962, a few months before her suicide that they come out immediately out of the sensuous and emotional experience she had. Therefore, she decried the cries of heart informed by nothing “except a needle or a knife” (Orr 169). This applies to her last volume Ariel as well. In the same interview she said that one should be able to control and manipulate those experiences, even the most terrified with intelligent mind. This is an exact process of her poetry, i.e. the manipulation of the terrifying experiences of her life. This betrays her emphasis…show more content…
We know her state of mind in the last year of her life i.e. Hughes’ betrayal and all. She realizes it with bitterness never experienced earlier, but the phenomenon of betrayal is sought to be hid on her part from her mother. She continued to write to her mother that she “has everything in life, I’ve ever wanted: a wonderful husband, two adorable children, a lovely home and my writing” (Plath, LH 458). This is the dialectic part of her poetry. As we have seen, the phenomenon that shows itself also keeps undiscovered some part of it. Man is what he is not; he…show more content…
She committed suicide in Febtuary 11, 1963. The hills step out into whiteness, reflecting death like whiteness. People could see it reflected on her face. They regard her sadly, obviously because she disappoints them. Her gloom spreads beyond people to natural objects, as the smoke of the train and the colour of rust raised by the hooves of the horse. Even horse’s bells are dolorus. Thus all morning is blackened. The fair fields meet her sad heart. In fact, they threaten to let her pass on to heaven, in dark without any father to protect her from death. There is no art in the sense, no artifice used to camouflage herself except blandly saying that she might die starless and fatherless. It is not that she has accepted death, but she now feels helpless –- to die once and for all, unable to bear existence. Throughout her career, Plath worked with, as Katha Pollitt notes, “tightly connected cluster of concerns –- metamorphosis, rebirth” (Pollitt 98). Her action of suicide was the last
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