Alice's Adventures In Wonderland Character Analysis

1139 Words5 Pages
Story telling animals, a hookah smoking caterpillar, a Cheshire cat who can teleport, decks of cards which are alive, and food that makes Alice grow or shrink drastically, what is this girl on? In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, the reader follows Alice on many peculiar and uncanny adventures, all the time speculating how on earth these bizarre events could possibly be happening to this inquisitive child. Throughout the novel, Alice starts questioning these things herself. How did she fit through the rabbit hole in the first place, and why didn’t she feel like the same old Alice once she fell to the bottom? Perhaps she was only escaping the boring reality in which she spent every day in a rich home, following strict rules…show more content…
For a petite seven-year-old girl, she possesses an extremely convoluted persona. Carroll portrays Alice as a very strong willed and confident child, with the mind of someone much older than she. “She is an ordinary person trying to make sense of a senseless situation and to understand the curious realm into which she has wandered.” (Stanley 22) In Wonderland, logic is nonexistent. Out of all the animals and creatures Alice encounters, absolutely none of them speak with any kind of logic or rules. Any seven year old would be terrified to find him or herself in a whole different realm, where rabbits speak and decks of cards come to life. Alice found herself feeling very strange in this unfamiliar world; however, she managed to absorb the outlandish qualities of Wonderland and those who inhabit it. On several different occasions throughout the story, the young girl finds herself utterly appalled by the ways of the Wonderlandians, but manages to keep herself in check and assimilate, or at least pretend to do so. Only once she has escaped Wonderland is her identity…show more content…
One thing is clear, his inspiration. Alice Pleasance Liddell. She was the daughter of a friend of his, and he found it much easier to talk to Alice than to talk to any adults he had ever encountered. He described Alice as a dreamer, and a child who knew how to make the most of life. Although Alice was his main inspiration, Charles got along better with children in general. It was obvious that he felt an undenying love and sympathy for every child who crossed his path. As a mathmatician and a writer, all of his works were somewhat out of the ordinary. “His two Alice books remain popular with both adults and children, and they have been interpreted by critics as guides to a Victorian childhood, as well as sophisticated treatises on philosophy, logic, and mathematics.” (Stanley 19) Using both his imagination and his intelligence, Carroll has managed to create multiple pieces of writing which contain such complicated and imaginative context. So, the question is whether or not there is an alternate meaning to Wonderland, or if the Alice novels just simply configured from Carroll’s complex imagination. Like the many readers of Alice’s Adventure’s in wonderland, John C. Butcher was also intrigued by Carroll’s writing and wondered about his social
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