Analysis Of Sir Thomas More 's Magnum Opus, Utopia Essay

Analysis Of Sir Thomas More 's Magnum Opus, Utopia Essay

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In Sir Thomas More’s magnum opus, Utopia, More coins the term “utopia” which is “an ideal or perfect place or state, or any visionary system of political or social perfection” (Mastin). A utopian society is an idyllic community where there are egalitarian values relating to the political, economic and social structures of a society, or in other words, a paradise on Earth. Voltaire, a sardonic polemicist, includes in his satire Candide, published in 1759, a hiatus in Candide’s hardships. Candide and his valet Cacambo serendipitously land in Eldorado, a geographically isolated utopia. For approximately a month, Candide and Cacambo live without suffering in Eldorado with Candide even remarking, “This is quite different from Westphalia and the baron 's castle. If our friend Pangloss had seen Eldorado, he wouldn’t have said that the castle of Thunder- ten-tronckh was the finest thing on Earth” (63). Eldorado is a utopia free from organized religion, political institutions and wealth classes; however, Eldorado itself is the object of satire by Voltaire. Because Eldorado is overemphasized as an absurd society with hyperbolized isolation from the rest of the world, an absence of government institutions, and an infeasible economic system, Eldorado is the subject of derisive satire because of the impracticality of a utopian society in reality.
Eldorado is mocked as an impossible dream by its mere nature of extreme remoteness from the rest of the world. Candide and Cacambo, only after an arduous and extensive journey, luckily arrive at Eldorado. Voltaire describes Candide and Cacambo’s journey writing: “They drifted for several miles between banks… After twenty-four hours they saw daylight again, but their boat was smashed against a reef. T...


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...om Eldorado go on to satirize human greed for wealth. Thus, a utopian society is impractical because men aren’t perfect and so no society can possibly create a perfect economic system.
Eldorado is satirized as an impractical society to elucidate that a utopian society cannot exist in reality. Eldorado’s extreme isolation from the rest of the world demonstrates its inability to coexist within the real world. Furthermore, the nonexistence of necessary government institutions represent Eldorado’s unrealistic nature. Lastly, because Eldorado’s economic system is classless and completely egalitarian, it is further depicted as nonviable due to mankind’s desire of status and prestige. Thus, a utopian society cannot be feasible in reality because there cannot be a realistic “perfect society”; in other words, there is no place that could be the “best of all possible worlds.”

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