Analysis Of Henry Luce 's ' The American Century ' Essay

Analysis Of Henry Luce 's ' The American Century ' Essay

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Before World War II, it became very clear that the US would play a new, and important leading role in the world. Henry Luce, author of The American Century, wrote about the new roles he anticipated the US to have. His essay calls the US to action in leading the rest of the world in our ways. About a year later on May 8th, 1942, Vice President Henry Wallace proposed similar ideas in a speech. He and Luce both saw the US as leading powers but disagreed on how the leading should be done. Wallace portrays the US in a friendlier manner. He calls the upcoming era the century of the common man while Luce calls it the American century. This topic is relevant today. How much involvement should leading countries have in developing ones and how should it be done? Luce and Wallace share their ideas on the matter. They both saw the US to be a world leader, but had different viewpoints about how the US should go about leading and spreading its influence.
In the beginning of Luce’s essay, he brings up four propositions. His first describes how populated the Earth has become. His second proposition states that the modern man is against war and knows that war has become so extreme that it can even lead to the destruction of man altogether. His third statement says that people are now able to produce all the necessities for their families. The fourth statement calls America to action as a leader. Luce says, “Fourth: the world of the twentieth century, if it is to come to life in any nobility of health and vigor, must be to a significant degree an American Century.” Luce says tyrannies require large amounts of space to work, but for freedom to work it must be a worldwide movement. For true freedom to exist, it must be for everyone, not just Ameri...


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...ording to Wallace. His idea of the century of the common man will work if the US uses its power to build economic peace. Similarly to Luce, Wallace sees American freedom as a good thing that needs to be spread in order for peace and abundant life.
Both Luce and Wallace recognized the fact that times were changing and the US was now the strongest country. Countries under the influence of tyranny exist but need US involvement and freedom to prosper. Both men believed that the US could change the world for the better if it spread its freedom. True freedom and peace will only exist once America does this. Luce’s views were strongly based on American empire. Wallace saw the opportunity for America to help lesser countries get a start. The US would not stay involved because that country would be capable of having freedom, peace, and good general welfare once taught how.

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Analysis Of Henry Luce 's ' The American Century ' Essay

- Before World War II, it became very clear that the US would play a new, and important leading role in the world. Henry Luce, author of The American Century, wrote about the new roles he anticipated the US to have. His essay calls the US to action in leading the rest of the world in our ways. About a year later on May 8th, 1942, Vice President Henry Wallace proposed similar ideas in a speech. He and Luce both saw the US as leading powers but disagreed on how the leading should be done. Wallace portrays the US in a friendlier manner....   [tags: World War II, United States, Cold War]

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