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Essay about Canadian Restitution of Japanese Canadians

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Canada’s restitution of Japanese Canadians for their internment is not sufficient for the pain and suffering experience

The Canadian Charter of Human Rights and Freedom today are well known internationally for encouraging multiculturalism, protecting individual rights and being inclusive of immigrants and refugees from other countries. Unfortunately, Canadian policies were very different several decades ago as they had a surprising history of discrimination and racism, especially towards Japanese Canadians. When Canada entered the Second World War [WWII], the country was not only at war with Nazi Germany, but also with the Japanese Empire. Compounded with the fear and distrust of Japanese immigrants that started even before WWII, Canadian policies became increasingly more prejudice against those of Japanese descent, to the point where Japanese Canadians were interned. Although the Canadian government acknowledged its prejudice policies and gave monetary restitutions to those directly affected by the internment, it could have done a lot more to compensate the Japanese Canadian, as the pain and suffering experienced by the Japanese Canadians were unforgettable and scarring, the amount of restitution paid by the Canadian government was much less than what was paid by other governments who had similar discriminatory policies, and the negative impact of internment on the Japanese culture and descendants in Canada.
Although the Canadian government reimbursed Japanese Canadians for their suffering during internment, the government did not admit full responsibilities for all the direct and indirect torturous acts it subjected Japanese Canadians to in WWII. About 22, 000 (from http://www.cbc.ca/history/EPISCONTENTSE1EP14CH3PA3LE.html...


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...ondon: DK Pub.
Sunahara, A. (2011, Jan 31). Japanese Canadians. Retrieved May 29, 2014, from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/japanese-canadians/
Sunahara, A. G. (1981). The politics of racism: The uprooting of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. Toronto: Lorimer.
United States History Museum (n.d.). Federal Republic of Germany: Summary of Restitution Law. Retrieved May 29, 2014, from http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/holocaust-era-assets/germany-restitution-law
Wright, S. (n.d.). The civil liberties act of 1988. Retrieved on March 29, 2014, from http://www.dartmouth.edu/~hist32/History/S06%20-%20Civil%20Liberties%20Act%20of%201988.htm
Yancey, D. (2000, March 20). Japanese Canadian Internment. Retrieved May 29, 2014, from http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/Canada/internment/intro.html





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