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Justice in Plato's Republic

- Justice in Plato's Republic Justice. What is justice. In this world where many people look out only for themselves, justice can be considered the happiness of oneself. But because selfish men do not always decide our standards in society, to find a definition, society should look at the opinions of many. Just as in the modern society to which we live, where everyone feels justice has a different meaning, the society of Plato also struggled with the same problem. In this paper, I will look into the Republic, one of the books of Plato that resides heavily on defining an answer to the meaning of Justice, and try to find an absolute definition....   [tags: Papers Justice Plato Republic Essays]

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Justice and Good in The Republic by Plato.

- In The Republic, Plato strives to display through the character and conversations of Socrates that justice is better than just the proper good for which men must strive for, regardless of whether they could receive equal benefit from choosing otherwise. His method is to use the dialogue from Socrates, questions which led the reader from one point to another, supposedly with convincing logic by obtaining agreement to each point before proceeding to the next, and so constructing an intriguing argument....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato and The Republic

- Plato and The Republic 360 BC THE REPUBLIC by Plato translated by Benjamin Jowett 360 B.C. THE INTRODUCTION THE Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them. There are nearer approaches to modern metaphysics in the Philebus and in the Sophist; the Politicus or Statesman is more ideal; the form and institutions of the State are more clearly drawn out in the Laws; as works of art, the Symposium and the Protagoras are of higher excellence....   [tags: Papers]

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Justice in Plato's Republic

- What is justice. Obviously, the word can have multiple meanings. If we were to walk in the Student Center and ask ten people what justice was, they probably all would have different responses. I am not saying that they would not have some of the same ideas, but ultimately, their responses would vary. Having said that, what if one of the people's ideas of justice included injustices. For example, Adolf Hitler believed that justice would be reached by completely wiping out Jewish people and creating a "perfect" blonde-haired, blue-eyed Aryan race....   [tags: Plato Philosophy Society]

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Conflicting Points in Plato's Republic

- Conflicting Points in Plato's Republic In his Plato’s Republic Socrates tries to find the values of an ideal city in order to rightly define justice. Although I agree with most of his ideals for the city, there are also many that I disagree with. Some of his ideas that I accept are that women should be able to share the same responsibilities as the men, having women and children in common, , the recognition of honor based on the self rather than heredity, that the best philosophers are useless to the multitudes, and the philosopher / king as a ruler....   [tags: Free Essays]

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Nichomachean Ethics by Aristotle and Plato's The Republic

- Where Does Voluntary Begin. Nichomachean Ethics by Aristotle attempts to define the meaning of ethics and to create the perfect society as did Plato in The Republic. In Aristotle’s attempt at definition he discusses the difference and significance of voluntary and involuntary action. Beginning by defining, Aristotle soon realizes many situations are too complex for just black vs. white terms and he introduces another term; non-voluntary. This leads to discussion of choice and deliberation, bringing his viewpoints into applicable terms, out of philosophy and into everyday life....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Cephalus' Departure in Plato's Republic

- At the beginning of the chapter, Cephalus invites Socrates to his home for philosophic discussion. Although it is the first scene, Cephalus appears only in this scene and does not reappear in the dialogue. To understand why he departs the scene so early, first we must focus on the purpose of philosophy. <p> Philosophers, like Socrates, question why things are, how they should be and what the best way to live is. Philosophy can be disturbing, as it was with Cephalus because it may contradict what you previously believed in....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Analysis of The Allegory of the Cave by Plato

- An Analysis of "The Allegory of the Cave" by Plato The Allegory of the Cave is Plato's explanation of the education of the soul toward enlightenment. He sees it as what happens when someone is educated to the level of philosopher. He contends that they must "go back into the cave" or return to the everyday world of politics, greed and power struggles. The Allegory also attacks people who rely upon or are slaves to their senses. The chains that bind the prisoners are the senses. The fun of the allegory is to try to put all the details of the cave into your interpretation....   [tags: Philosophy Plato]

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Plato

- Plato (circa 428-c. 347 BC) Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens. His father, Ariston, was believed to have descended from the early kings of Athens. Perictione, his mother, was distantly related to the 6th- century BC lawmaker Solon. When Plato was a child, his father died, and his mother married Pyrilampes, who was an associate of the statesman Pericles. As a young man Plato had political ambitions, but he became disillusioned by the political leadership in Athens. He eventually became a disciple of Socrates, accepting his basic philosophy and dialectical style of debate: the pursuit of truth through questions, answers, and additional questions....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato

- Since the human beings came together and began to live communities, necessities to be administrated became the most important subject for human kind. There were said many things on this issue; there have been put many claims and interpretations on well, just and equal administration by many philosophers. They searched for the best administration that will guide people equally, just and well; that will provide sustainability, peace and prosperity between communities. In fact there are many forms of government that operating in the world....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Platos Republic

- Introduction Platonic philosophy begins to appear in the middle dialogues. What are the important elements of this philosophy. The middle dialogues are dominated by the theory of the Forms. This is a theory that Plato developed from certain seldom-stated assumptions that Socrates held. Socrates' view was that the reason he and his interlocutors failed to find definitions for things was that they were stuck in case-based, specific examples. Does bravery mean fighting against a person stronger than yourself, or does it mean having the courage to back down from the fight and accept the insults of cowardice that come with that....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato Vs Shelley

- Many works of literature provide responses to much debated topics. Opinions are brought forth by means of rhetorical devices and supported by some type of accepted truth. In two such pieces, The Republic by Plato and “A Defense of Poetry” by Shelley, Plato expresses a belief about poetry that Shelley disagrees with and responds to. Through rhetorical devices such as metaphors and symbolism and the use of deductive logic and Socratic writing, Plato provides a strong, very supported argument while Shelley’s long sentence structure, analogies and metaphors are weak in comparison....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato: Patriot Or Dissident

- Plato, the Greek philosopher is considered to be one of the greatest thinkers in history and is called by one scholar “the fountainhead through which all western thought flows.” In his book The Republic he outlines what the perfect city-state would look like and how it would operate. Along his path of reason he makes no attempt to hide his disdain for other political systems. That includes democracy, a system he does not seem to agree with. In fact, from what I read, Plato obviously disagrees with democracy and its principals....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato Vs. Aristotle

- Plato vs. Aristotle Plato and Aristotle, two philosophers in the 4th century, hold polar views on politics and philosophy in general. This fact is very cleverly illustrated by Raphael's "School of Athens" (1510-11; Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican), where Plato is portrayed looking up to the higher forms; and Aristotle is pointing down because he supports the natural sciences. In a discussion of politics, the stand point of each philosopher becomes an essential factor. It is not coincidental that Plato states in The Republic that Philosopher Rulers who possess knowledge of the good should be the governors in a city state....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Moral Psychology

- Plato's Moral Psychology I argue that Plato's psychological theories are motivated by concerns he had about moral theory. In particular, Plato rejects the modern account of rationality as the maximization of subjectively evaluated self-interest because, had he adopted such an account, his theory of justice would be subject to criticisms which he holds are fatal to the contractarian theory of justice. While formulating a theory to remain within ethical constraints sometimes violates the canons of scientific theorizing, Plato avoids this mistake....   [tags: Argumentative Rationality Argument Papers]

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Plato's View on Life

- Plato's View on Life In his book titled The Republic Plato arises many questions concerning the philosophy of life. One of the most difficult subjects that he touches is the definition of justice. He tries to explain to his fellow friends how is the good man supposed to behave, and which is better to be just or unjust but that answer becomes very complicated and leads Plato to examine that rather complex subject in great detail. He demolishes the three popular definitions of justice that are brought up, which imply that justice is " paying one's debts," "helping friends and harming enemies," and "whatever is to the advantage of the stronger" and argues that these definitions are not compl...   [tags: Papers]

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Analysis of Thrasymachus' Argument in The Republic

- Thrasymachus has just stated, "Justice is nothing other than the advantage of the stronger", and is now, at the request of Socrates, clarifying his statement.<p> <i>"'Don't you know that some cities are ruled by tyranny, some by a democracy, and some by an aristocracy?' 'Of Course.' 'And in each city this element is stronger, namely, the ruler?' 'Certainly.' 'And each makes laws to its own advantage. Democracy makes democratic laws, tyranny makes tyrannical laws, and so on with the others. And they declare what they have made - what is to their own advantage - to be just for their subjects, and they punish anyone who goes against this as lawless and unjust....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Justice in Plato´s The Republic

- In book four of Plato's “The Republic” Socrates defines justice in the individual as analogous to justice in the state. I will explain Socrates' definition of justice in the individual, and then show that Socrates cannot certify that his definition of justice is correct, without asking further questions about justice. I will argue that if we act according to this definition of justice, then we do not know when we are acting just. Since neither the meaning of justice, nor the meaning of good judgement, is contained in the definition, then one can act unjustly while obeying to the definition of justice....   [tags: Plato's The Republic]

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Justice in The Republic by Plato

- Justice in The Republic by Plato In Plato's The Republic, justice is depicted as a major part in a perfect society. Justice is said to breed a good society, whereas injustice will breed a bad one. Plato defines justice in dialogue as "keeping what is properly one's own and doing one's own job." (Pg. 146) Under the rules set for this perfect society, people are to practice the one profession at which they perform best. This profession also corresponds to a certain social class. Under no circumstances can one change this profession....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato Republic

- The Republic of Plato explores the meaning of Justice from both an individual and societal point of view. It also looks into the incorporation of Justice into human society, in other words, how to create an ideal state of social order in a society. This is carried out through the various dialogues and arguments between Socrates and other individuals. During this process, Socrates gave a detailed analysis of the formation, structure and the organization of an ideal State, and through this, vindicate the intrinsic value of being a Just person in a society and the virtues that each individual must possess....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Analysis of Plato's Republic

- Philosophy is a Greek word meaning "love of wisdom." Throughout Plato's Republic, wisdom plays an important role. According to Plato, education is wisdom. In the passage, 518d, Plato discusses the true meaning of education vicariously through Socrates. Some literary mechanisms can be found in the passage and I will show how they fit in the text and how they contribute to the main themes of Plato's Republic. In Book VII Socrates has finished listening to other opinions and is now formulating a response....   [tags: World Literature]

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Justice in Plato's "The Republic"

- Plato creates a seemingly invincible philosopher in The Republic. Socrates is able to refute all arguments presented before him with ease. The discussion on justice in Book I of The Republic is one such example. Socrates successfully refutes each different view of justice presented by Cephalus, Polemarchus, and Thrasymachus. Socrates has not given us a definitive definition of justice, nor has he refuted all views of justice, but as far as we are concerned in Book I, he is able to break down the arguments of his companions....   [tags: World Literature]

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Plato's Republic Justified

- Plato's Republic Justified In Plato's Republic, Socrates leads a discussion with his fellow philosophers attempting to isolate the concept of justice in the soul. In order to accomplish this task, they hypothesize that justice can occur both in the city as well as and the soul. Because the philosophers are more familiar with the workings of a city than the soul, they try to find justice by creating the ideal city, or Kallipolis. When they find justice in the ideal city, they are able to apply as well as justify the use of that same concept in the soul....   [tags: Papers]

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Republic by Plato War in Relation to Justice, Injustice, and the Just City

- Republic by Plato War in Relation to Justice, Injustice, and the Just City Beginning in Book I Socrates states clearly that injustice causes war and justice causes the opposite, but by Book V he seems to have a completely different perspective on whether war is just or not. His mind apparently begins to change in Book II when he introduces the second class of people, namely the guardians, with the purpose of defending the city. Throughout Books II, IV and V Socrates discusses the topic of war in light of justice and finally concludes that war is the outworking of the perfectly just city....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing and Contrasting Plato's The Republic and Thomas More's Utopia

- ... Men dedicated themselves to a specific trade. The most common trades in the Utopia world are the manufacturing of wool, flax and carpentering. Each person is required to work in one trade, but they are not limited. If someone wants to learn about multiple trades, they are welcome to do so. The Utopians have a 24-hour cycle in which the time is divided in half; half for the day and half for the night. Of the 12 hours in the day, 6 of them are required for work and the other 6 hours are divided into 3 before dinner and 3 after dinner....   [tags: work, duties, abilities]

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Aristocracy in Plato's The Republic and to Build a Democratic State

- In The Republic by Plato, Plato constructed an ideal city where Philosophers would rule. Governed by an aristocratic form of government, it took away some of the most basic rights a normal citizen should deserve, freedom of choice, worship, and assembly were distressed. Though the idea of philosopher kings is good on paper, fundamental flaws of the human kind even described by Plato himself prevent it from being truly successful. The idea of an ideal democratic government like what our founding fathers had envisioned is the most successful and best political form which will ensure individual freedom and keep power struggle to a minimum....   [tags: Ancient History]

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The Apology and the Republic

- Socrates was a renowned philosopher in the ancient Grecian times. His peak was around the Peloponnesian War, when the Spartans defeated the Athenians and ended the Golden Age. The reason Socrates is one of histories most famous philosophers is largely due to Plato's writings. Two of Plato's famous works include The Apology and The Republic, both written about Socrates' views about the so called "wise philosophers" of his time. The two works hold unique views about government, as well as opening the eyes of the Grecian people to the world as they knew it....   [tags: Philosophy Socrates Plato]

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Plato

- Plato was a philosopher and educator in ancient Greece. He was one of the most important thinkers and writers in the history of Western culture. Plato was born in Athens into a family that was one of the oldest and most distinguished in the city. His father Ariston died when Plato was only a child. The name Plato was a nickname meaning broad shoulders. Plato's real name was Aristocles. Plato had aspirations of becoming a politician, however these hopes were destroyed when his friend Socrates was sentenced to death in 299 B.C....   [tags: essays research papers]

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plato & aristotle

- In these sessions, I have gained a better understanding of Aristotle and Plato’s ideas and theories. Particularly, I have a specific interest in Aristotle and the notion of the two extremes and to aim towards the “gray or middle of the road”. I also have an interest in Plato’s theory regarding the just and unjust and the repercussions of their actions. Aristotle is trying to achieve that single point in which life is the best of both worlds. He attempts to define an obtainable median point in life....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Poetry and Music for Plato

- When he wrote The Republic, Plato recognized the need for the rulers or `guardians' of his kallipolis to be good and righteous. He also realized that "imitations practiced from youth become part of nature" (Plato, Republic, 395d). It was with these two thoughts in mind that Plato decided to censor poetry and representations in the education of the guardians. He felt that, in portraying gods and heroes as slavish and iniquitous, poets, playwrights, musicians and storytellers encouraged people to imitate and adopt iniquitous and slavish natures or habits....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato's View on Lying

- Plato's View on Lying What is a lie. And when is it appropriate to tell a lie. Are two questions to think about after reading Plato's Republic translated by G.M.A Grube. A lie by definition is a false statement intended to deceive. Most people would agree this is not a "just" thing to do to your friends. In American society today, lying has always been a "bad" thing to do. Trust is very important, parents always tell their kids never to lie or they will loose their trust. Plato disagrees, with what most parents say to their children....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge

- Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge Plato contended that all true knowledge is recollection. He stated that we all have innate knowledge that tells us about the things we experience in our world. This knowledge, Plato believed, was gained when the soul resided in the invisible realm, the realm of The Forms and The Good. Plato's theory of The Forms argued that everything in the natural world is representative of the ideal of that form. For example, a table is representative of the ideal form Table....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Good Life

- Starting as a wrestler Plato strived to be in the Olympics. Always falling short, he left his Olympic dream behind. After the attempt of wrestling he wanted to become a tragic poet. Failing to impress the judges at any major competition he changed course and headed over to hear one of Socrates’ speeches. He then made the decision to follow in the same footsteps of Socrates. Becoming one of Socrates’ pupils Plato wrote Socrates’ works and began to develop his own ideas along the way. He also founded the first university called the academy....   [tags: olympics, socrates speech]

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Education: Keeping the Republic Together

- Education: Keeping the Republic Together Our world today puts huge amounts of emphasis on education, specifically in order to get a better job, make more money or take enjoyment in what we do. We see a similar importance placed on education in Socrates’ make believe city, as described in Plato’s Republic. However, Socrates has made it clear that this education is not for personal betterment or gain, but rather for the common good. Socrates has created his Republic with education of its citizens at the core....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato versus Mill on Censorship

- In review of both Plato and Mill’s arguments for and against censorship, I come to my conclusion that holds true to Mill. I could not have said it any better than Mill’s two main arguments against censorship. Humans make mistakes and making mistakes is entirely unavoidable because we are not perfect. Therefore, without being perfect, how can a human, like Plato, decide the perfect way to form a society. Plato makes sense in that he does not care about happiness he only cares about an ideal state with little or no issues....   [tags: philosphical analysis]

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The Republic Does Justice Pay

- The Republic Does Justice Pay In the Introduction of Plato's Republic, a very important theme is depicted. It is the argument of whether it is beneficial for a person to lead a good and just existence. The greatly argued position that justice does not pay, is argued by three men Thrasymachus, Glaucon, and Adeimantus. By incorporating all three men into a collective effort I believe I can give a more flattering depiction of injustice. First, we must explore the basis of the moral skepticism argument in The Republic, given by Thrasymachus....   [tags: Papers]

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Justice In Book I Of The Republic

- The Republic of Plato begins in a similar fashion that many other Platonic dialogues begin, with that of a question. The conversation between Socrates and the aged Cephalus becomes a philosophical discussion of what advantages money has brought to Cephalus' life. Cephalus replies that money has allowed him "to tell the truth and pay one's debts" (331 b). Nevertheless, Socrates believes this does not portray an accurate description of what justice is. The rest of the first book is a discussion of the definition of justice, mainly that of Thrasymachus' definition....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Matrix and the Allegory of the Cave by Plato

- The Matrix and the cave There are numerous similarities between The Matrix and “The Allegory of the Cave” by Plato. “The Allegory of the Cave” has prisoners of the cave that are unable to move and only able to see what passes over their cave and there is one prisoner that is freed (Plato, circa 380 BC). The Matrix has humans trapped inside of the matrix. (Silver Pictures & Wachowski Brothers, 1999). The main character is Neo. Neo represents the prisoner from Plato’s cave that was freed. Neo woke up to a reality that was not easy to understand....   [tags: prisoners, humans, perception, reality]

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Literary Works of Plato: Critical Essay

- This essay attempts to present a critical analysis of the literary works of Plato. Plato's literary work span is wide containing issues pertaining to justice, social life, specific virtues, good ruler's knowledge, value of justice, love and many others. The philosophical tones of Plato resembled very much with that of Socrates addressing the similar issues in his own Platonic version of dialogues. The Republic and the citizen played an important role in his work in addressing to the various social issues and intricate understanding of the human nature of human responsibilities in a republic....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato's The Republic: Analysis of the Chapter Entitled "Allegory of the Cave"

- One of the world’s most revered philosophers, Plato, was born in 428 BC. As a young man, Plato, became a devout student of Socrates. Plato quickly adopted Socrates’ teachings and turned his studies toward the question of virtue and noble character. After the execution of his beloved mentor, Plato founded the first English university called the Academy. He wanted thinkers to have a place were they could word toward better government for Greek cities. Over the duration of his life Plato wrote many books, and his most influential work is The Republic....   [tags: The Republic, Plato]

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The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic

- The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic      Dr. Malters’s comments: This student does two things quite remarkable for an undergraduate student. In his compact essay, not only does he display an in-depth understanding of complex perspectives on justice put forth by the protagonist Socrates, he deftly explains how Plato has artfully made rude objections by a seemingly minor character early in the dialogue function as a structuring device for nearly all the important ideas examined thereafter....   [tags: Plato Republic Essays]

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The Republic, by Plato

- Plato’s ideal society is one that depends on the just actions of its people. In his utopia, all men and women are able to maximize their potential and in turn utilize their talents and skills for the good of all. Happy citizens form a happy society. This perfect society has been both praised and criticized on the basis of some radical elements it possesses: The citizens of Plato’s ideal society are able to curb their self-interest, and because they are happy, or at least psychologically conditioned to believe that they are, these people choose to join in the collective effort and submit to the philosopher-king’s rule for the benefit of all....   [tags: Reflection, Utopia, Conditioning]

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Socrates' Aim in "The Republic of Plato"

- From the very beginning of The Republic of Plato it has been Socrates’ aim to prove to Adeimantus and Glaucon, why men lead just lives. In order to thoroughly explain his point of view as we now know Socrates went about setting up his city of thought. Through the formation of the city of thought we are first introduced to Socrates idea of what his ideally just city would be like and how it would be formed. We are from the formation of this completely just city introduced us to the minds of the “philosopher-kings” who are to be the rulers of Socrates’ city....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato's Republic

- Plato's Republic “the having and doing of one’s own and what belongs to one would be agreed to be justice.” (The Republic 434a) In other words the above statement means that justice, according to Plato, is doing only the tasks assigned to them by nature. This is the fundamental notion for his creation of an ideal city. It is both knowing what true justice is and where one belongs in the city that the ideal can be achieved. What this means to politics in the ideal city is that only a certain class of person has the ability to engage in politics, just as only a certain person has the ability to engage in carpentry....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Republic

- The Philosopher King stands far above others in ancient Athens. At his own peril, amidst constant political chaos and corruption, Plato takes a brave stand for justice, for freedom, and for equality. The Republic, written around 375 B.C., isn't just Plato's treatise on the ideal state, nor is it just a state-of-mind journey from ignorance to enlightenment. Plato also taught at his Academy, the first university in Europe, that political science is the science of the soul. Indeed, Plato's wisdom is a striking example of visionary perfection, where a pure idea of virtue allows the greatest possible human freedom in accordance with laws by which the freedom of each is made to be consistent with...   [tags: Philosophy]

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Beauty and Love in the Republic of Plato

- ... He claims that any object’s beauty is determined by whether it is shaped like the type of the thing that object is. It is referred to by Plotinus as ‘formedness’. This theory is further explained in his work, the “Enneads”, where he says: “We hold that all the loveliness of this world comes by communion in Ideal-Form. All shapelessness whose kind admits of pattern and form, as long as it remains outside of Reason and Idea, is ugly from that very isolation from the Divine-Thought. And this is the Absolute Ugly: an ugly thing is something that has not been entirely mastered by pattern, that is by Reason, the Matter not yielding at all points and in all respects to Ideal-Form....   [tags: philosophy, objective, subjective]

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The Ethical Egoist in Plato's Republic

- The ethical egoist is one who believes that it is morally right to act strictly in one's own self-interest. Understandably, this belief poses a threat to social cooperation and, therefore, clearly introduces a significant political problem. I believe that the best example of ethical egoism is displayed in Book I of Plato's The Republic. In this Book, Plato introduces the idea of ethical egoism, explains the political problem posed by it, and addresses the problem through the words of Socrates. I will use this paper to explain and clarify the arguments for and against the concept of ethical egoism, with specific focus on the political problem it poses and the proper approach to addressing th...   [tags: politics, ethical egoism, socrates]

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The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic

- The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato's Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos)....   [tags: Papers]

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Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic

- Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic In 1921, Vance Palmer, the famous Australian author and poet, noted, in his essay titled "On Boundaries", that "it is the business of thought to define things, to find the boundaries; thought, indeed, is a ceaseless process of definition". As Palmer noted, humans, by their very nature, attempt to define all things. But, more than that, we attempt to redefine subjects and ideas that have already been defined so that we can better understand what they mean, where we came from, and, perhaps most importantly of all, who we are....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

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Analysis of Plato´s Republic

- Republic, perhaps Plato’s most famous work focusing on justice and its values, is also home to Socrates’ unique ideas and the challenges that he faces throughout his dialogues with other philosophers. Nevertheless, justice is not the only topic that Plato examines in his work. In the Republic, a simple discussion of the justice and the different characteristics of cities, escalates into a discussion about the souls of individuals. Socrates starts out by offering an agreement to the fact that since cities are made of individuals, their characteristics can also be found in individuals....   [tags: justice, value, soul, individual, logic]

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Plato’s The Republic

- Plato’s The Republic In the simile of the cave We are asked to picture a group of people sitting inside a dark cave, their hands and feet are bound in such a way that they can only look at the back wall of the cave. Behind the chained prisoners a fire is burning, and between them and this fire a path runs along which men carry figures, the shadows of these figures are projected onto the back wall of the cave. The prisoners experience is based solely on the shadows, which form their world....   [tags: Papers]

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“A Truly Just City?”

- In the book “The Republic,” by Plato, Socrates constructs a utopia of a pure aristocracy to channel his visions of what he constitutes to be a just city. Socrates’ ideal of justice, is of a virtue that can be developed out of reason and knowledge, and when tuned correctly can be the justified way of governing a city. Fundamentally, the rulers are driven by specific appetites and virtues, that develop a cycle of ruling between the stages of aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy and eventually a tyranny....   [tags: The Republic, Plato, Socrates]

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Comparing Plato's Republic and Gulliver's Travels

- Plato's Republic and Gulliver's Travels       In The Republic, Plato attempts to define the ideal state as it relates to the tripartite division of the soul. In this division, wisdom, the rational characteristic of the soul, is the most valuable and important. In the ideal state the ruling class would be the guardians, those who maintain rationality and will operate according to wisdom. Each individual "should be put to use for which nature intended them, one to one work, and then every man would do his business" (276d)....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Believing is Seeing

- In Plato’s The Republic, Book seven, he discusses the cliché “seeing is believing”. By Plato’s use of symbols to help explain his point of ignorance in truth due to our traditions, society’s constant fear of change and our natural ability to question what we see. In this allegory, the depictions of humans as they are chained, to only learn by sight. Plato toy’s with the notion of what would happen to people should they embrace the concepts of philosophy, to become enlightened by it, to see things as they truly are....   [tags: Plato, The Republic]

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Defining Justice in Plato’s the Republic

- Throughout the work of Plato’s the Republic, the true definition of justice is argued. It becomes evident that Plato himself views justice as good because it is connected to the form of the greatest good. Plato’s the Republic also explains that justice is worthwhile for its own sake, in combination with the pleasure and rewards that are accompanied with it. However, because it is natural for men to always be inclined to seek out their own self-gain and benefit, it is obvious that true justice cannot be achieved due to the multiple forms and obstacles that are presented to man-kind....   [tags: soul, enlightened, ethics]

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Comparing Contemporary Politics to Plato's "The Republic"

- Contemporary politics seems to more closely reflect Thraysmachus’ view of justice more so than Plato’s. Contemporary is defined as belonging to the present time adding on to it, politics, which are decisions and actions between parties with power. In “The Republic”, Socrates asks Thraysmachus to give him the answer to his question of what justice is. Thraysmachus was a sophist, who charged people for wisdom. The battle of seeking the true meaning of justice began when Socrates and Polemarchus were arguing....   [tags: justice, power, corruption]

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Socrates’ Examination of the City-State in Plato's Republic

- Despite having no written works, Socrates remains one of the greatest and influential philosophers of all time. In Plato Republic, Socrates’ account for the origin of the city-state is a main concept. On a broad scale, Socrates views justice as the main relationship between the individual and the state. Moreover, Socrates also examines the nature of injustice in the city-state, which serves to explain his concern about the early moral education of the potential guardians. In Book II of Plato Republic, Socrates concern for the good of the souls of the potential guardians correlates to his argument for censorship in Books II and III....   [tags: injustice, guardians, luxuries]

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Plato's The Republic – Should We Search for the Truth?

- Plato's Republic – Should We Search for the Truth. There is the common belief that what we experience as reality is just a mere illusion of the truth. Plato's allegory of the cave in "The Republic" describes human beings as being chained in a cave, such that they cannot move but are forced to face a wall, onto which shadows of puppets and themselves are projected. They are deceived into believing that their reality is composed of these "shadows" when actually, the world of truth is the "light" outside the cave....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

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The Allegory of the Cave, from Book VII of Plato's Republic

- The cave, symbolic of the mother's womb, is the source of life and death. In “The Allegory of the Cave”, from Book VII of Plato’s Republic, the theme of the cycle of life and the transition from the unborn to the deceased is representative of the cycle of entry and exit from the cave. If based upon this idea, one can conclude that the chains are symbolic of the umbilical cord. This concept reflects the Greek values of reproduction, humanism, and the anti-hero, because the anti-hero is symbolized by returning to the mother....   [tags: The Cycle of Life]

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Thrasymachus and Socrates

- In Plato’s The Republic, we, the readers, are presented with two characters that have opposing views on a simple, yet elusive question: what is justice. In this paper, I will explain Thrasymachus’ definition of justice, as well as Socrates’s rebuttals and differences in opinion. In addition, I will comment on the different arguments made by both Socrates and Thrasymachus, and offer critical commentary and examples to illustrate my agreement or disagreement with the particular argument at hand. The debate between Thrasymachus and Socrates begins when Thrasymachus gives his definition of justice in a very self-interested form....   [tags: Justice, Plato's The Republic]

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Plato and the Nuclear Family in his Work:The Republic

- The nuclear family, consisting of a mother, father, and children, is something very familiar to our society. We hold these relations as ideal and form our lives around their bonds. In the Republic, Plato suggests to abolish families and replace them with the Guardians. This is easily one of Plato’s most controversial ideas; it contains positive elements, but is seen as impractical to undesirable by many. The rationale behind Plato’s idea consists of many different parts, which are focused on a main goal of unity....   [tags: Society, Offspring]

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Philosophy CPT: “The unexamined life is not worth living”

- The term “philosophy” means the love of wisdom, and those that study philosophy attempt to gain knowledge through rationality and reason. 1 Socrates, the father of ancient philosophy, once stated “the unexamined life is not worth living”. This is the most important part of life and it is need to find purpose and value in life. If a person chooses to live their life without examination, their life would lack value and they would be unhappy. They would also be ignorant to the effects of their choices on themselves and the people around them....   [tags: Plato, Socrates, The Republic]

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Description of a Just Society in Book III of Plato’s Republic Socrates

- In Book III of Plato’s Republic Socrates is describing his “just society”. He uses the metaphor of people being made of metal to describe which class they belong in. He uses an example of “some men the power of command, and in the composition of these he has mingled gold, wherefore also they have the greatest honour”. He then describes the next class of people being made of silver, who are to be “auxiliaries”, which is describing some sort of warrior. The final two classes of people he describes are composed of brass and iron, which will be the “husbandmen and craftsmen”....   [tags: talent, social classes, utilitarianism]

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Comparsion of Realism and Idealism in Niccolo Machiavelli´s The Prince and Socrates´ Plato´s Republic

- ... Finally, these chosen individuals, who know the difference between what really is and what only seems to be, are best appropriately to rule because they are guaranteed to make appropriate decisions concerning the well-being of the republic. Plato assures that when a person is ruled by reason and has an even balance with the emotional and appetitive parts of the soul, he will achieve a condition of moral goodness. When the moral goodness exists in the person, there also exists courage, wisdom, temperance, and justice: the four cardinal virtues Socrates mentions....   [tags: ruling, success, fortuna, free-will, morals]

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Plato's Theory of Education

- Humanity is in a constant process to better themselves, as a result of their self-transcending nature. This intuitive quality pushes the soul to speculate on virtue and therefore, think philosophically. Achieving the highest form of philosophical thought will only occur if the individual has first been engaged in Plato's Theory of Education. Though Plato argued that “the power and capacity of learning exists in the soul already” (VII), he also recognized that this education is a gradual process....   [tags: "The Republic", Philosophy]

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The Genius of Plato

- Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens, Greece. When he was a child his father, Ariston, who was believed to be descended from the early kings of Athens died, and his mother, Perictione married Pyrilampes. As a young man Plato was always interested in political leadership and eventually became a disciple of Socrates. He followed his philosophy and his dialectical style, which is believed to be the search for truth through questions, answers, and additional questions. After witnessing the death of Socrates at the hands of the Athenian democracy in 399 B.C., Plato left Athens and continued to travel to Italy, Sicily, and Egypt....   [tags: Plato Biography]

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Plato and Aristotle: Their Contributions to the Development of Western Philosophy

- The philosophies of Plato and Aristotle and their contributions to the development of western philosophy. Plato was a classical Greek philosopher and one of the top 5 contributors to Western philosophy, educator after his mentor, Socrates and teacher of Aristotle. His sophistication as a writer started while under the tutelage of Socrates, continued through his establishing of his own academy, (The Academy of Athens which has been labeled as the first institution of higher learning in the Western World) and throughout his many years as an open minded author....   [tags: Plato and Aristotle Essays]

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Plato

- Plato Plato was born in Athens to a wealthy family and lived from 429-347 B.C.E. He was Socrates' greatest student and held his teacher in such high regard that in most of his works Socrates plays the main character. Some people doubt the existance of Socrates but, "like nearly everyone else who appears in Plato's works, he is not an invention of Plato: there really was a Socrates" (Kraut). Plato wrote many works asking questions about terms such as justice, piety, and immortality to name a few....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers]

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Plato's Repubulic- Music, Art, Literature

- In The Republic, Plato uses many different aspects in Books II, III, and X including: art, literature, and music. These aspects play a huge part in the building of the “ideal city”. Plato includes what can and cannot be used and what is good and what is bad for the city. While building the city, everything is broken down and analyzed by Plato. Art as an imitation of real things, three types of imitation, the types of literature, art, and music allowed and not allowed in the city, and the impact of art on the people of the city will all be analyzed in this paper....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Writings

- Plato's Writings Plato's profound early writing on politics, ethics and education discussed in the Republic are the foundations of today's governments, nations and discourses. At least that is what I am told. Plato's ideology and reasoning are not always the most believable and desirable, it makes me wonder which part of today's government practices must give due to the Republic (to be discovered in Gov 101). While it is easy to be disgusted with Plato's idealism and philosophy, which seems to deter any type of an acceptable nightlife, it does leave the reader with a desire to keep trudging through endless mounds of self-indulged prose to discover Plato's reasoning....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Education Philosophy

- Plato was born into an aristocratic Greek family between 428–427 BC. At the age of twenty he became a disciple of the philosopher Socrates. Socrates continued to be an enormous influence on Plato throughout his life. Plato was an idealist and believed that everything that we see in this world is a less accurate representation of what its true form should be. He believed in a world of unchanging and unrelated forms that corresponded to universal definitions. This belief led to his theory of forms and became an essential part of his philosophy....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato: A student of Socrates

- A student of Socrates, a major western civilization influence, and an amazing philosopher, Plato was his name and he was one of the most influential persons in history. Plato was born in Greece in 427 BC and grew up in a wealthy and noble family. He became a philosopher when his teacher, and another great philosopher of Greece, Socrates, was tried and executed in 399 BC. Plato wrote a lot about Socrates in his works of ancient Greece. Plato helped form classical education, and we would not have a good basis for education in America and western civilization....   [tags: philosopher, student, Greece]

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Aristotle vs Plato

- One of the most fundamental questions of moral philosophy as it applies to our everyday lives is the relationship between truth and philosophy, and as such, it is appropriate that Plato, as one of the founders of Western philosophy, attempts to deal with them. Before one can fully comprehend how Plato understands this interconnection, it is imperative to understand how Plato understands truth and happiness as separate entities—that is, what is truth and what is happiness. Plato never explicitly declares what the truth actually is; rather, the closest he comes is describing characteristics of the truth (much in the same way he flirts with defining justice until the Republic)....   [tags: Truth, Happiness]

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Plato Banning Poetry

- ... Furthermore even if he did make more than one bed those would merely be copies. Although the carpenter makes beds in similar quality it is an only an imitation of a particular bed. The painter’s bed is purely an imitation of the carpenter’s product. The painter is then accused to be the imitator of things that others create, because they are one who makes something at third removed from nature. Plato states that although this painting looks different it is not different, and it imitates illusion....   [tags: justice, city, knowledge, souls, corrupt]

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Plato's Concept of the Soul

- Plato’s famous theory of “The Concept of the soul” can be found within his book The Republic. Here Plato responds to the Sophists on why one should live morally. At the time Sophists were men who used Philosophy for profit they did this by inventing moral loopholes to get people out of obligations. Or excuse peoples of wrong doings or immoral behavior. They questioned Plato by asking, ”Why should one ought to be moral when morality is apparently a social device for maintaining order”. He responds by saying, Morality is a direct cause of happiness, ones happiness directly responds to ones moral behavior....   [tags: philosophical theories]

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Relating Socrates to Platos the Republic

- By studying a variety of events and people involved in the Peloponnesian War and the Theban play Antigone, it becomes noticeable that many of these events and people can be explained through Platonic terms. Throughout the Republic, Plato conveys his philosophical thoughts about democracy, justice, and education in a society through his main character Socrates. As Socrates encounters many enlightened people of his time, he questions them on rhetorical issues dealing with society and human nature....   [tags: World Cultures]

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Democracy Outlined by Plato and Aristotle

- In the fifth-century BC, Athens emerged as one of the most advanced state or polis in all of Greece. This formation of Athenian ‘democracy’ holds the main principle that citizens should enjoy political equality in order to be free to rule and be ruled in turn. The word ‘democracy’ originates from the Greek words demos (meaning people) and kratos (meaning power) therefore demokratia means “the power of the people.” The famous funeral speech of Pericles states that “Our constitution is called democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people.” However, only citizens (free adult men of Athenian descent) could participate in political matters....   [tags: democracy, athens, greece]

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Comparing Aristotle and Plato

- Comparing Aristotle and Plato We have two great philosophers, Plato and Aristotle. These are great men, whose ideas have not been forgotten over years. Although their thoughts of politics were similar, we find some discrepancies in their teachings. The ideas stem from Socrates to Plato to Aristotle. Plato based moral knowledge on abstract reason, while Aristotle grounded it on experience and tried to apply it more to concrete living. Both ways of life are well respected by many people today. Plato started his teachings in remembrance of his good friend, Socrates....   [tags: Papers]

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Justice Exemplified by Plato and Thucydides

- Plato's Book I of The Republics presents three fundamental views on justice which are exemplified in Thucydides' On Justice, Power and Human Nature. Justice is illustrated as speaking the paying one's debts, helping one's friends and harming one's enemies, and the advantage of the stronger. In both their works, Plato and Thucydides write of the view that justice is honoring one's debts. In The Republics, Cephalus asserts that justice is "the truth and giving back what a man has taken from another." In other words, he believes that we should be truthful and pay back our debts to man and the gods....   [tags: Comparative Literature]

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Classical Theories - Aristotle and Plato

- Plato and Aristotle have both documented strong opinions about the influence and social purpose of poetry. Plato, in The Republic, outlines reasons for his `refusal to admit the imitative kind of poetry'(Plato cited in ed. Adams 1992, p. 31). Plato's reference to `poetry' does not apply to the poetry of contemporary society, as it was a performance art and not meant for silent reading and reflection. Julia Annas (1981, p. 94) believes that Plato's concern `was with popular culture, the culture that surrounds children as they grow up; in a present-day setting his concern would be with novels, (TV and movies)'; such as the 2003 movie House of Sand and Fog....   [tags: Personal Essays]

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