Your search returned 200 essays for "James The Turn of the Screw":
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Turn of the screw

- “The Turn of the Screw” Henry James, the famous author of ‘The Turn of the Screw’ was born on April 15, 1843 to his wealthy parents Henry James and Mary Walsh. His father, also called Henry James, was an Irish immigrant and by the time his own children were born he had inherited a lot of money from his father; and at this time Henry James senior and his family were living in New York. Henry James author of ‘The Turn Of The Screw’ was one of five children and had an older brother William who was born in 1942 he had four younger siblings also; Garth Wilkinson born 1845, Robertson born 1846 and Alice born 1848....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Comparing Ambiguity in The Turn of the Screw and The Innocents

- Ambiguity in The Turn of the Screw and The Innocents How successfully does the black-and-white film version of The Turn of the Screw, The Innocents (Jack Clayton, 1961), render the ambiguity of James' original text. Ambiguity, the art of deliberately creating something that can have more than one meaning, lends itself to the written word without difficulty. A written story can involve ambiguity in the characters, plot, narrative - every factor in the story can have to it a sense of uncertainty....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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The Turn of the Screw

- “An action-occurs which proceeds from the supernatural (from the pseudo-supernatural); this action then provokes a reaction in the implicit reader (and generally in the hero of the story). It is this reaction which we describe as ‘hesitation,’ and the texts which generate it, as fantastic” (Todorov 195). The fantastic is the moment of hesitation that is experienced by the reader who is confronted by a supernatural event in the story or novel and thus understands the laws of nature are put into question....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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James's Pragmatism and Plato's Sophistes

- James's Pragmatism and Plato's Sophistes ABSTRACT: In the first chapter of Pragmatism, William James outlines two philosophical temperaments. He argues that though one's temperament modifies one's way of philosophizing, its presence is seldom recognized. This statement by James led me to Plato's Sophistes, especially the relationship between temperament and being. Although Plato describes certain temperaments, I hold that the main topic is being. The ancients restricted All to real being, e.g., the tangible or the immovable....   [tags: Pragmatism Sophistes Plato James Essays]

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Fools Crow by James Welch

- Fools Crow by James Welch We turn back the clock as Welch draws on historical sources and Blackfeet cultural stories in order to explore the past of his ancestors. As a result, he provides a basis for a new understanding of the past and the forces that led to the deciding factor of the Plains Indian tribes. Although Fools Crow reflects the pressure to assimilate inflicted by the white colonizers on the Blackfeet tribes, it also portrays the influence of economic changes during this period. The prosperity created by the hide trade does not ultimately protect the tribe from massacre by the white soldiers....   [tags: Fools Crow James Welch Essays]

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Gus in James Duncan's The River Why

- Gus in James Duncan's The River Why James Duncan’s book entitled, The River Why, focuses around the main character, Gus, and how he changes throughout the book. In this book Gus is discovering what life really is and that the whole world does not revolve around fishing. After moving out of his erratic house he spends all of his time fishing at his remote cabin, but this leaves him unhappy and a little insane. He embarks on a search for him self and for his own beliefs. Duncan changes Gus throughout the book, making Gus realize that there are more important things to life than fishing, and these things can lead to a happy fulfilled life, which in turn will help Gus enjoy life and fishing mo...   [tags: James Duncan River Why Essays]

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James Hogg

- Biographical Summary James Hogg was born and raised in Scotland on his family farm. Hogg only went to school for a few months due to the family bankruptcy. This caused his early introduction into literature to be consisted of the Bible and the stories he was told from his mother and uncle. When he grew older, Hogg received a job as a Shepard’s assistant from James Laidlaw. While working there, Laidlaw taught Hogg how to read, using newspapers and countless theological materials. As Hogg became increasingly better at reading and writing, Laidlaw allowed him to use Laidlaw’s own library, in order to continue his reading career....   [tags: James Hogg Biography]

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The Character of Daisy in Henry James' Daisy Miller

-          What is the purpose of Daisy in the novel Daisy Miller by Henry James?  Why did James create such a beguiling and bewildering character?  Since the publication of James's novel in 1878, Daisy has worn several labels, among them "flirt," "innocent," and "American Girl."  Daisy's representation of an American Girl of the late 19th century is evident.  Her free-spiritedness and individuality reflect the social movement of the American middle-class.  The question of Daisy's innocence, however, remains unanswered.  One of the most interesting aspects about Daisy is her distance from the reader.  The reader is not given access to Daisy's inner thoughts or emotions.  Instead, the reader mu...   [tags: Henry James, Daisy Miller]

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A Study of James Allen's Book

- A Study of James Allen's Book Contents Abstract 2 Introduction: James Allen Biography……. 3 Lessons learned and main ideas found 4 Quotes from the book to be remembered 6 Conclusion. 7 Abstract James Allen proves that it is possible to pack dozens of valuable nuggets in a small package. The language is often lofty and dated, which in other works detracts from the material. In this case it reads like the writings of a wise old scholar, enhancing the content and its weight. More than just an essay on positive thinking, Allen walks the reader through applications for personal growth, putting thought into action, using personal gifts to achieve right purposes, persevering to develop chara...   [tags: James Allen ]

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James Joyce’s Dubliners

- James Joyce’s Dubliners is a collection of short stories that aims to portray middle class life in Dublin, Ireland in the early twentieth century. Most of the stories are written with themes such as entrapment, paralysis, and epiphany, which are central to the flow of the collection of stories as a whole. Characters are usually limited financially, socially, and/or by their environment; they realize near the end of each story that they cannot escape their unfortunate situation in Dublin. These stories show Joyce’s negative opinion of the ancient Irish city .The final story, “The Dead,” was added later than the others; consequently, “The Dead” has a more positive tone and is often an exceptio...   [tags: James Joyce]

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James Baldwin's Writing Technique

- The Baldwin Technique James Baldwin is highly regarded as one of the great writers of his time. In the “Notes of a Native Son” he describes a very influential moment in his life. The essay’s setting takes place during the Harlem riots in New York City and Detroit. The riot in New York all began due the fatal shooting of a young African American boy by a white police officer. Protesters began to protest the police brutality, but then fights and looting broke out when some protesters became unruly....   [tags: James Baldwin]

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Homosexuals and James Baldwin's Role in the Civil Rights Movement

- During the Civil Rights Movement, James Baldwin wrote many articles and essays on racial issues. His unique and powerful style invoked the thoughts of many people. What also made Baldwin stand out from others was his homosexuality. Baldwin wrote several essays and novels that had a homosexual theme rooted within the story. It was through this method that Baldwin was able to express his homosexuality and at the same time present a view of black culture that was highly unacceptable during that time period....   [tags: James Baldwin Civil Rights Gay]

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The Inward Turn of Modernist Literature

- Modernists did not have faith in the external reality put forth by social institutions, such as the government and religion, and they no longer considered these avenues as trustworthy means to discover the meaning of life. For this reason they turned within themselves to discover the answers. Modernist literature is centered on the psychological experience as opposed to the external realities of the world. The experience is moved inwards in an attempt to make modernist works more representative of reality by making the experience more personal....   [tags: Literature, T. S. Eliot]

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James Joyce's Dubliners

- James Joyce's Dubliners The struggle that the Irish people must face with the problems of their society can be seen clearly in the book Dubliners, by James Joyce. This book portrays a unique image of what the Irish people are experiencing during the time. However, this book gives a deeper view of what really is occurring because it gives us the themes of the problems that are happening in a peculiar way. In fact, one can see throughout the stories the humanities theme of individual and society, and the literary theme of journey and escape....   [tags: Dubliners James Joyce Essays]

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The Earthboy Place by James Welch

- "It was called the Earthboy place, although no one by that name (or any other) had lived in it for twenty years."(166)James Welch in his fictitious allegory, "The Earthboy Place," presents the idea of how assimilation has caused many Indians to stop continuing with their lives as a native. Consequently, they leave their homelands to earn a living in another "world" which shows adaptation to the Westerners' culture; likewise to the writing of McNickle's. "He wore a blue suit and a white shirt and his tan shoes were new and polished."(113) In "A Different World" as depicted by D'Arcy McNickle, Archilde loses his freedom of native life and has now followed the rules of a White man's way of lif...   [tags: Welch James Earthboy]

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Henry James' The Wings of the Dove

- Henry James' The Wings of the Dove This paper will present briefly Henry James and his thoughts about the art of fiction that is presented by his same titled essay before thoroughly analyzing his novel: The Wings of the Dove. James’ ideas on his article The Art of Fiction will be applied to The Wings of the Dove and the narrative style that he uses will be indicated by certain quotations taken from the novel. James had read classics of English, American, French, and German literature and Russian classics in translation....   [tags: Henry James Wings Dove Essays]

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Henry James' The Europeans

- In his novel The Europeans, Henry James tells the story of an American family that is visited by their European cousins. James uses these circumstances to depict the differences between Europeans and Americans. The Americans tend to be frightened of the Europeans, since they seem quite foreign within the puritanical American community. On the other hand, the Europeans are surprised by the Americans' provincial ways. Reaction to the unfamiliar is a central element of the novel. Each character's reaction to the unfamiliar reveals his or her personality and also determines whom that character is capable of tolerating and of loving....   [tags: Henry James Europeans Culture Essays]

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Marketing James Patterson

- Marketing James Patterson James Patterson is a popular crime fiction author with a unique business strategy: he produces approximately 3 times more books annually than comparable authors and employs unconventional advertising tactics. Patterson’s unique writing style and use of co-authors to write more books has proven to be successful, generating annual book sales of $120 million. Using his advertising background, Patterson has turned his name as an author into a well-known brand. Patterson built his empire by finding a successful method and using it consistently....   [tags: Marketing James Patterson Ficton Author]

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James Baldwin's Life in Notes of a Native Son

- Cycles of Hatred James Baldwin lived during an extremely tumultuous time where hatred ruled the country. Race riots, beatings, and injustice flooded the cities that he, as well as most African Americans, was forced to live with every day. Many people, out of fright, suppressed their opposition to the blatant inequalities of the nation. However, some people refused to let themselves be put down solely because of their skin color and so they publicly announced their opposition. One such person was James Baldwin, who voiced his opinion through writing short stories about his experiences growing up as a black man....   [tags: James Baldwin]

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Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners

- Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners Within the body of literary criticism that surrounds James Joyce's Dubliners is a tendency to preclude analysis beyond an Irish level, beyond Joyce's own intent to "create the uncreated conscience of [his] race." However, in order to place the text within an appropriately expansive context, it seems necessary to examine the implications of the volume's predominant thematic elements within the broader scope of human nature. The "psychic drama" which places Dubliners within a three-tiered psychological framework ² desire, repression, agression ² lies at the root of a larger triangular structure that pervades many of our most fundamental belief...   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Essays]

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Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist by James Joyce

- Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist by James Joyce Stephen Dedalus, the main character in most of James Joyce's writings, is said to be a reflection of Joyce himself. In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, the reader follows Stephen as he develops from a young child into a young artist, overcoming many conflicts both internally and externally, and narrowly escaping a life long commitment to the clergy. Through Joyce's use of free indirect style, all of Stephen's speech, actions, and thoughts are filtered through the narrator of the story....   [tags: James Joyce Papers]

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Analysis of The Novel Dubliners by James Joyce

- In response to his publisher's suggested revisions to Dubliners, James Joyce "elevated his rhetoric to the nearly Evangelical [and wrote]: 'I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilization in Ireland by preventing the Irish people from having one good look in my nicely polished looking-glass'"1. A pivotal part of this "looking-glass" is Joyce's representation of Dublin, which functions akin to an external unconsciousness in that a series of unrelated characters experience similar problems by virtue of their common connection to the city....   [tags: dublin, ireland, james joyce]

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Personal Paralysis in Dubliners by James Joyce

- Personal Paralysis in Dubliners by James Joyce Imagine being paralyzed; unable to move freely. Most people when they think of paralization, it is connected to the physical. However, paralysis takes on more than one meaning and goes way beyond physicality. There are three definitions from Webster online: 1. Complete or partial loss of function especially when involving the motion or sensation in a part of the body 2. Loss of the ability to move 3. A state of powerlessness or incapacity to act The first and second definitions are primarily about physical paralysis, however in the first one, “loss of function,” could be any kind of function....   [tags: Dubliners James Joyce Paralysis Essays]

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Social Order in P.D. James’ A Mind To Murder

- P.D. James’ A Mind To Murder - Social Order One of the basic assumptions underlying any detective novel is a sense of social order. The novelist assumes that the reader agrees that killing people is wrong; it does not matter if the victims are exemplary citizens or odious individuals, it is the mere act of snuffing out another’s life that is against the social order. In P.D. James’ A Mind To Murder, Nurse Marion Bolam’s murder of her stuffy and self-righteous cousin Enid illustrates a situation where the nurse and her invalid mother had suffered from her cousin’s stinginess; James gives us a clear look at the murderer’s fear that if Enid had been given time to change her will as she...   [tags: P.D. James A Mind To Murder]

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Taoist Reading of Henry James novel, The American

- A Taoist Reading of Henry James' novel, The American Henry James' novel, The American, tells the story of one man's journey in search of the Tao. Or, rather, the qualities of Christopher Newman are the qualities of a student of the Tao, following the teachings of the Sage described in Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching. Each time Newman digresses from his path, the lure or object which he desires eventually pushes him back on to it. James's description of Newman as an American incorporates many tenets of the Tao, beginning with the sudden enlightenment on Wall Street that leads to the events in this novel....   [tags: Henry James American Essays]

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The Individuality of Daisy in Henry James' Daisy Miller

- Why did James create such a beguiling and bewildering character. Since the publication of James's novel in 1878, Daisy has worn several labels, among them "flirt," "innocent," and "American Girl." Daisy's representation of an American Girl of the late 19th century is evident. Her free-spiritedness and individuality reflect the social movement of the American middle-class. The “depths” of Daisy Miller that Kelley refers to could be read as “unsounded,” since the reader receives little insight to her feelings, and “unappreciated,” based on the perceptions of most characters....   [tags: Henry James, Daisy Miller]

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Importance of the Journey in James Joyce’s Dubliners

- Importance of the Journey in James Joyce’s Dubliners "In Ireland the inevitable never happens and the unexpected constantly occurs." Sir John Pentland Mahaffy describes Ireland in a way comparable to James Joyce’s depiction of Ireland in his book Dubliners. Joyce wrote his book of short stories to show how he viewed Dublin and its inhabitants. Joyce did not have positive memories of Dublin and his book casts a negative image upon almost all of Dublin. In Dubliners, James Joyce uses characters and their journeys through society to give his perception of Dublin....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners]

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Themes of Alienation and Control in James Joyce's Araby

- Alienation of “Araby” Although “Araby” is a fairly short story, author James Joyce does a remarkable job of discussing some very deep issues within it. On the surface it appears to be a story of a boy's trip to the market to get a gift for the girl he has a crush on. Yet deeper down it is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will somehow alleviate his miserable life. James Joyce’s uses the boy in “Araby” to expose a story of isolation and lack of control....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Themes]

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Role of Religion in the Wilderness: James Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans

- Freedom of Religion – Freedom from Religion In the midst of his already successful career, Sigmund Freud decided to finally dedicate a book of his to religion, referring to the subject as a phenomena faced by the scientific community. This new work, Totem and Taboo, blew society off its feet, ultimately expanding the reaches of debates and intellectual studies. From the beginning, Freud argues that there exists a parallel between the archaic man and the contemporary compulsive. Both these types of people, he argues, exhibit neurotic behavior, and so the parallel between the two is sound....   [tags: freudian, james cooper]

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The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

- Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw is a metacritical novella that has caused a plethora of debates among critics over decades of time since 1898 due to the multiplicity in perceptions in regards to the connection between the frame and the narrative. These discussions revolved around the pivotal notion of the ghosts and their existence in the home of Bly, which, when established, serves as a basis for the interpretation of the role of the frame and its characters. Although this enthralling tale contains perplexing turns and can be scrutinized from many different perspectives for its boundless critical controversies, the debates have focused mainly on two views: the apparitionists and the non-...   [tags: metacritical novella, apparitionists]

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Examining the Impact of Social Class in Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw

- Examining the Impact of Social Class in James’s The Turn of the Screw Throughout the latter half of the second millennium, horror fiction, or horror fantasy, began to emerge as an overwhelmingly popular literary tool utilized by various authors across the globe. In the late 18th, 19th and 20th century specifically, gothic horror and horror literature manifested themselves as one of the most desired literary genres, representing some of the most well-known authors and works of the time. The works of Edgar Allen Poe and others were extremely popular among 19th century readers as they brought horror literature to the mainstream and exposed the world to a unique and re-defined form of entertain...   [tags: horror fiction, gender issues]

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Maternal Instinct in The Turn of the Screw

- ... However, going to Mrs. Grose for information is extremely maternal. Since there is a very real possibility of danger, the governess wants to keep the children as safe as possible. The only way she can protect Miles and Flora is by gathering information and becoming aware of what is going on. Speaking of the children, the next relationship that must be focused upon is the one between the governess and Flora, the estate owner’s eight-year-old daughter. In the second chapter of the story, the governess’s maternal instinct shows up in the most simple of acts: she brings Flora along with her to go pick up Miles....   [tags: Henry James, story analysis]

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How Henry James Influenced Edith Wharton

- Both the 19th and 20th century authors of Henry James and Edith Wharton are commonly compared to one another and their works are criticized as being close to, if not, the same. For ten years, the two authors had been close friends and even traveled throughout France and Europe together looking for inspiration and new ideas. Wharton had never taken any type of criticism well. Eventually Edith Wharton sent her first written story, “The Line of Least Resistance,” to Henry James and she learned to accept criticism respectfully as one author to another....   [tags: Literacy Analysis ]

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James Joyce's The Dead

- James Joyce's The Dead In The Dead, James Joyce lets symbolism flow freely throughout his short story. James Joyce utilizes his main characters and objects in The Dead to impress upon his readers his view of Dublin’s crippled condition. Not only does this apply to just The Dead, Joyce’s symbolic themes also exude from his fourteen other short stories that make up the rest of Joyce’s book, Dubliners, to describe his hometown’s other issues of corruption and death that fuel Dublin’s paralysis. After painting this grim picture of Dublin, James Joyce uses it to express his frustration and to explain his realistic view that the only solution to the issues with Dublin depends on a move to the W...   [tags: James Joyce Dead Essays]

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Use of Language in James Joyce's Ulysses

- Use of Language in James Joyce's Ulysses In his essay “The Decomposing Form of Joyce’s Ulysses,” Henry Staten has argued “that Ulysses achieves some of its most characteristic effects by pressing the internal logic of mimesis to the limit, above all through onomatopoeia, which manifests in a peculiarly condensed way the self-contradictory character of the realist project” (Staten 174-5). Mimetic narrative and method are undone by an onomatopoeiac mode, which is conceived by Stephen “as the pure self-expression or self-annunciation of reality” (175): “Signatures of all things I am here to read, seaspawn and seawrack, the nearing tide…” (Ulysses 3.2-3, emphasis added)....   [tags: James Joyce Ulysses Decomposition Essays]

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James Joyce's Dubliners: Two Gallants

-   In "Two Gallants," the sixth short story in the Dubliners collection, James Joyce is especially careful and crafty in his opening paragraph. Even the most cursory of readings exposes repetition, alliteration, and a clear structure within just these nine lines. The question remains, though, as to what the beginning of "Two Gallants" contributes to the meaning and impact of Joyce's work, both for the isolated story itself and for Dubliners as a whole. The construction, style, and word choice of this opening, in the context of the story and the collection, all point to one of Joyce's most prevalent implicit judgments: that the people of Ireland refuse to make any effort toward positive cha...   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners]

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James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans

- James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans The French and Indian War of the eighteenth century had uniquely complex qualities, matched by the gravity of its outcome. The myriad of cultures involved the French, Canadian, American, English, Algonquians, and Iroquois whom make this era fascinating. The multi-ethnic element made it a war built upon fragile alliances, often undermined by factional disputes and shifting fortunes. Violent as it was, its battlefields encompassed some of the most beautiful country to be found anywhere....   [tags: Last Mohicans James Cooper Essays]

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Ineffective N.A.A.C.P. in James Baldwin's Down at the Cross

- The Effect of the N.A.A.C.P. There are many different opinions of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (N.A.A.C.P.), the premier organization for African-American rights around the world. Some believe that the organization has made great strides towards equality and fairness across the country, and that segregation could still be a prominent fixture today if not for the N.A.A.C.P. Others scrutinize the efforts of the N.A.A.C.P., and claim that it is nothing more than a figurehead organization that doesn’t actually advance the African-American people....   [tags: James Baldwin NAACP]

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Sandy Welch's Adaptation of Henry James' The Turn of the Screw

- “A literary adaptation creates a new story; it is not the same as the original, but takes on a new life, as indeed do the characters.” (12) Therefore when we are discussing and analysing the adaptation I do not find it necessary to discuss the issue of fidelity which has become a mere tedious discussion. However, as “adaptations are a synergy between the desire for sameness and reproduction on the one hand, and, on the other, the acknowledgement of difference.” (Hayward) I do feel it is essential to compare the sameness and difference Sandy Welch uses in her glossic adaptation compared to the novel as this helps the reader to form an interpretation of the story or message it is trying to ach...   [tags: The Turn of the Screw]

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James Baldwin's Giovanni's Room

- James Baldwin's Giovanni's Room James Baldwin’s novel Giovanni’s Room is titled such for the purpose of accentuating the symbolism of Giovanni’s room. Within the novel Giovanni’s room is portrayed with such characteristics as being Giovanni’s prison, symbolic of Giovanni’s life, holding the relationship between Giovanni and David, being a metaphor of homosexuality for David and being a tomb underwater. These different portrayals of Giovanni’s room are combined within the novel to create an overall negative metaphor of homosexuality as perpetuated by society....   [tags: James Baldwin Giovanni's room Essays]

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