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Understanding the Effects of Resuce Shelters from a Dog's Perspective Essay example

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A man walks through the door of the building pulling a reluctant mass attached to a leash; as he nears, it becomes clear that the ‘mass’ is really a dog! The dog is a mixed-breed of some sort, trembling with his tail poised stiffly between his legs and his overgrown claws scrapping against the unfamiliar tile floor as he tries to gain footing on its slippery surface. The man appears unmoved by his dog’s display of disorientation and simply pulls harder on the leash to drag him along grudgingly on the slick surface of the floor.
The woman behind the counter forces a smile toward the approaching man, already prepared for what is about to conspire. Unfortunately, she has seen this many times and is all too familiar with the procedures on admitting a dog into the rescue shelter.
The man looks to the woman and smiles, “Hi! I am here to drop off my dog, Diesel.”
“Great!” the women replies back to the man, straining her voice to sound enthusiastic. “I’ll just have to ask you a few questions and we’ll get started on the paper work. It should only take a few minutes. First off, do you know how old your dog is?”
“Oh, yeah!” the man answered, “I have had Diesel since he was a pup! Let’s see, he’ll be almost ten this year I should think.”
The woman looks down and the grey muzzled dog as he looks pleadingly up at her, shivering and confused. She knows that the chances of a family being interested in a dog so much older is rare and that his chances for re-adoption are slim.
They go through the paperwork together and within minutes, Diesel is ready to be escorted to the shelter clinic. In the clinic he will be poked and prodded by the shelter vet to test for various ailments and to administer proper immunizations. A ‘fun’ procedure f...


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...in more light (Horowitz, 2009). Gathering in more light prohibits their eyes to see even in a light impoverished situation.
A canine’s retina is distinctly different from a human’s retina by the distribution and speed of their photoreceptor cells (Horowitz, 2009). The densely populated distribution of photoreceptor cells accounts for a dog’s ability to track fast moving objects and is consequently associated with their inability to detect most colors (Horowitz, 2009). The rapid action of the photoreceptor cells permits dogs to respond to the world a split second before humans (higher flicker-fusion rate) (Horowitz, 2009).



Works Cited


Beerda, B.; Bosch, G.; Hendriks, W.H.; Vander Poel, A.F.B.; & Verstegan, W.A. (2007).
Impact of nutrition on canine behaviour: current status and possible mechanisms. Nutrition Research Reviews (Vol. 20, Issue 2, pp. 180-94).


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