Preview
Preview

Making The New England Aquarium Accessible To Minority Communities Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1541 words (4.4 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The New England Aquarium had a difficult dilemma. The organization wanted to become an entity representative of the city of Boston and characterize its ethnic, racial, and economic diversity. However, since the late 1960's, the aquarium was considered inaccessible by minority communities. As such, its board of trustees wanted to change this image. In the early 1990's, they developed a plan to "attract and involve" populations previously underrepresented. At the same time, the education department began to implement programs targeting minority youth. Despite the good intentions, these efforts proved unsuccessful and jeopardized the cohesion of the department. The experiences of the youth programs in the education department demonstrate considerable structural and human resource frame management faults. The issues that highlight the structural faults revolve around the mission statement and goals of the aquarium, as well as the structure configuration and its coordination. Human Resource issues revolve around the relationships and conflicting needs of the aquarium and its people, including the minority youth.

Perhaps the most visible and obvious structural issue revolves around the aquarium's mission statement and goals. As noted in the case study, the original mission statement "make known the world of water through education, research, and exhibition" concentrates on its goal to bring sea life to the community. The new mission statement saw the aquarium as a "responsive community resource that attracts the broadest possible audience delivering highest quality experience" and as "a culturally diverse staff."

When the new mission statement was implemented, diversity initiatives were limited to the education depar...


... middle of paper ...


... later minority youth to join full time staff, is a best practice for human resource management (Bolman p.146). This principle encourages people to work well in hopes of a promotion, creates loyalty and allows for younger staff to learn from older, more experienced members.

The New England Aquarium’s foray into diversity was tumultuous and administrators learned lessons the hard way. Despite the early problems administrators faced with the minority youth programs, the needs of both parties were eventually addressed. The aquarium was reaching communities they hadn’t before while young people experienced meaningful job opportunities. Problems within the structural frame were present but I’m confident that the work Rosa Hunter was doing would lead them to eventually restructuring, finding easier ways to communicate and working as a group to reach their mission.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Dogmas of Puritanism Essay - The Puritans were a significant grouping of English Protestants with iconic moral beliefs and values that remain widely recognized even today. The inception of the Puritans branch back to Marian exiles after the dethroning of Elizabeth I of England in 1558- they migrated to New England in 1620, bringing stern religious and educational footholds to the New World. Puritan values and ideology defined and impacted the political, social, and economic development of the New England colonies from 1630 to the 1660s....   [tags: Colonists, Society, New England] 1152 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Changes in the Land by William Cronon - The Europeans changed the land of the home of the Indians, which they renamed New England. In Changes in the Land, Cronon explains all the different aspects in how the Europeans changed the land. Changing by the culture and organization of the Indians lives, the land itself, including the region’s plants and animals. Cronon states, “The shift from Indian to European dominance in New England entailed important changes well known to historians in the ways these peoples organized their lives, but it also involved fundamental reorganizations less well known to historians in the region’s plant and animal communities,” (Cronon, xv)....   [tags: indians, europeans, england]
:: 1 Works Cited
859 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Effects of Industrialization and the Conditions of the Working Class in England - Effects of Industrialization and the Conditions of the Working Class in England In the middle of the 19th century the industrial revolution was flourishing in England. With all of the advancements in machinery there would be new opportunities and drawbacks for citizens. Many would leave their lives on the farms and work in factories with unsafe settings. Karl Marx felt that the new advancements in society were able to support the fourth stage of human development, Communism. Along with these new advancements the people would have to learn how to self-govern themselves in the workplace and understand their new responsibilities....   [tags: Communism Karl Marx History Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1268 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Applying the Kotter Eight Step Change Model to New England Wire and Cable - Companies are not unlike species, they must both change with the current environment or risk becoming extinct. Charles Darwin succinctly states this idea, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent but the one most responsive to change.”1 In the case study, “Other People’s Money,” in the scene presented there is a proxy vote going to take place by the shareholders of the New England Wire and Cable (NWC) Company. But, before the votes are casted both the Chairman of the Board and patriarch Andrew "Jorgy" Jorgenson and the potential majority shareholder Lawrence "Larry the Liquidator" Garfield are afforded the opportunity to deliver speeches to the body of...   [tags: New England Wire and Cable]
:: 1 Works Cited
1921 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies Essay - By 1700, differences in religious convictions, wealth, and climate transformed the New England and Chesapeake Bay colonies into distinct societies with markedly contrasting cultures and values. Having fled England because of religious persecution, the Puritans placed a greater emphasis on religion. In contrast, the Chesapeake society, consisting mostly of men who were affected by the primogeniture laws, placed more importance on wealth and land. The climates of the two societies fostered distinct economies and new cultural practices, such as the tobacco wives in the Chesapeake region....   [tags: chesapeake society, new england, puritans] 670 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about Use of Allegories in A New England Nun - Use of Allegories in A New England Nun    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife.          This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary....   [tags: New England Nun Essays] 1725 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Fever in Salem: A New Interpretation of the New England Witch Trials Essay examples - The author of this book has proposed an intriguing hypothesis regarding the seventeenth-century witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts. Laurie Winn Carlson argues that accusations of witchcraft were linked to an epidemic of encephalitis and that it was a specific form of this disease, encephalitis lethargica, that accounts for the symptoms suffered by the afflicted, those who accused their neighbors of bewitching them. Though this interpretation of the Salem episode is fascinating, the book itself is extremely problematic, fraught with historical errors, inconsistencies, contradictions, conjecture, and a very selective use of the evidence....   [tags: New England Witch Trials] 685 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Opening Doors for Women Limited opportunities for women to share their opinions publicly throughout the Nineteenth century caused an abundance of females to communicate their ideas through writing. Catharine Maria Sedgwick was among the first of American authors to publish historical and other fiction. Much of her work deals with the role of white women in society, especially involving the Cult of Domesticity or True Womanhood....   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
3303 words
(9.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale - Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale In her article “‘But is it any good?’: Evaluating Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction,” Susan Harris provides methods and criteria for examining Women’s Fiction in what she calls “process analysis” (45). To apply Harris’ guidelines to Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale, I must first “acknowledge the ideological basis of [my] endeavor” (45) as a feminist/equalitist critique of the text. Furthermore, I identify the three-fold approach that Harris describes as historical, in distinguishing early nineteenth-century from mid- to late-century attitudes, rhetorical, in labeling Sedgwick’s communicat...   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
2005 words
(5.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay about Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun - Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun It is hard to imagine a life in American society without first picturing marriage in a church, white picket fences, and babies. Life alone for those who turn from marriage and children can be seen as a promise of loneliness. Yet choosing not to get married or to have children does not mean unhappiness. In the words of Anne Morrow Lindbergh: “There is a quality to being alone that is incredibly precious. Life rushes back into the void, richer, more vivid, fuller than before” (qtd....   [tags: Mary wilkins freeman New England Nun Essays] 1478 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]