The Yellow Wallpaper, And Virginia Woolf 's A Room Of One 's Own

The Yellow Wallpaper, And Virginia Woolf 's A Room Of One 's Own

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As humans have progressed in history women’s role in society has changed in many ways. From reading novels during the times where these shifts occur one can see how we got to where we are from the reactions of these books towards the change. Looking at Bram Strokers Novel Dracula, Name of Charlotte Gilman’s book The Yellow Wallpaper, and Virginia Woolf’s book A Room of One’s Own, One can see the struggles society went through trying to accept the change.
In the novel Dracula there are two main female characters. One’s name is Lucy Westenra, the other Mina Harker. In the Book Lucy represented the traditional Victorian female who was ditsy and frail. Lucy would not partake in the matters of the men and would keep her traditional ways about herself. She needs the help and emotional support of others and cannot rely on herself. Mina on the contrary is very involved with the matters of the men actually helping them on their quest to kill the vampire. The way Stroker portrays Mina vs Lucy One can see that he wants to show his readers that he believes the way women should be in life is li...

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