The Wounded Knee Massacre Of 1890 2 Essays

The Wounded Knee Massacre Of 1890 2 Essays

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The Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890 2

No one can describe The Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890 without digging in the past and getting some background on the events leading up to The Wounded Knee Massacre. There has been a battle between America and them wanting to remove Native Americans from their land ever since America was “discovered” by the Americans. In 1829 at his inaugural address President Andrew Jackson emphasized his desire “to observe toward Indian tribes within our limits a just and liberal policy, and to give that humane and considerate attention to their rights and their wants which is consistent with the habits of our Government and the feelings of our people”. Within 14 months of that speech Jackson himself urged Congress to pass the removal Act, which forced Native Americans to leave what was US back them and settle in the Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. (Native American – Removal from their Land – Immigration, n.d, para 1) Many Cherokee tribes came together as one and took the legislation to the Supreme Court and in 1832 it was Ruled in favor of the Cherokees, but some of the tribes signed treaties with the government for federal aid in help them relocate. (Native American – Removal from their Land – Immigration, n.d, para 2) Even though the Supreme Court in favor of the Cherokees, Andrew Jackson ignores the ruling. In 1865 there was a congressional committee that began a study of Indian uprisings and the wars in the West, resulting in a “Report on the Condition of the Indian Tribes, which was released in 1867. ( Home, n.d. para 2) This study and report led to establish an Indian Peace Commission which would end all wars and any future conflicts. ( Home, n.d. para 2) In the Sioux Treaty of 1868 th...


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...ng from under the blankets they used to warm themselves. An officer yelled,” Look out!!! Look out!!!” as quickly as he said that more rifles appeared from under the blankets, and a warrior fired and more went after the guns that were just surrendered to the Army. The troops were standing in between the tents of the children and women and when the warriors started firing they left the tents unguarded. Which left many unarmed women and children dead, with the final count unknown there have been rumors of as little as 150 to as much as 300 dead with more than half being children and women. There was a
The Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890 6

blizzard the next day after fire calmed down and the bodies were left frozen for a couple days till they were able to be dugout. This was called Battle of Wounded Knee but was considered more a massacre than anything.














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