Would whey protein supplementation decrease muscle atrophy in immobile Special Forces soldiers during Special Support and Reconnaissance missions?

Would whey protein supplementation decrease muscle atrophy in immobile Special Forces soldiers during Special Support and Reconnaissance missions?

Length: 1855 words (5.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Term Papers

Open Document

Essay Preview

Would whey protein supplementation decrease muscle atrophy in immobile Special Forces soldiers during Special Support and Reconnaissance missions?


Introduction

Watching silently from a concealed position lays an elite soldier on a Special Support and Reconnaissance (SSR) mission. Less then one hundred metres from the enemy, that soldier may be required to lie there unmoving and undetected for long periods, days to weeks at a time. During this time his muscles are slowly beginning to atrophy due to disuse, just like any other immobile person’s, be it due to Doctor ordered bed rest, recovery from an accident, the zero gravity of space flight, or immobility due to ageing. The aim of this literature review is to investigate the studies undertaken in the area of nutritional prevention of muscle atrophy. In particular, looking at the use of protein supplementation to increase muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and ascertaining whether there is any application to the elite soldier whose muscles are currently wasting away but will be needed in the near future.

Background

The continuing threat of terrorism and rogue states means that SSR missions are becoming an increasing reality for many Special Forces (SF) units as their particular skill sets are called into action. SSR missions can require SF soldiers to be immobile for 10 to 12 days at a time, as space or covert requirements do not always allow for movement or exercise. Danish SF have noted that this appears to effect soldiers strength and agility, leading to lower extremity injuries and loss of speed, potentially putting the soldier in danger (Christensen, et al., 2008). Muscle atrophy and loss of strength due to immobility has been well noted, especially due to bed re...


... middle of paper ...


...e function and size. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 93(4), 463-468. doi: 10.1007/s00421-004-1236-9
Tesch, P. A., von Walden, F., Gustafsson, T., Linnehan, R. M., & Trappe, T. A. (2008). Skeletal muscle proteolysis in response to short-term unloading in humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 105(3), 902-906. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.90558.2008
Trappe, S., Costill, D., Gallagher, P., Creer, A., Peters, J. R., Evans, H., et al. (2009). Exercise in space: Human skeletal muscle after 6 months aboard the International Space Station. Journal of Applied Physiology, 106(4), 1159-1168. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.91578.2008
Trappe, S., Trappe, T., Gallagher, P., Harber, M., Alkner, B., & Tesch, P. (2004). Human single muscle fibre function with 84 day bed-rest and resistance exercise. The Journal of Physiology, 557(2), 501-513. doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2004.062166


Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »