The Women's Suffrage Movement Essay

The Women's Suffrage Movement Essay

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Women suffrage movement was and continues to be one of the most incredible events to occur in history of United States. It was a struggle by women’s to achieve their rights to vote and to stand for electoral office. Women in United States did not have the right to vote until as early as 19th century. Besides the struggle of many individuals female suffrage was very difficult to achieve. It was not until August, 1920 women were not conferred with voting rights at national level. These rights of women effected the elections of federal government and became an important factor in deciding the national leaders.
Women suffrage can be considered as a black mark on the history of United States and it was the single largest enfranchisement and a full-fledged political movement. In early 1800’s women were expected to restrict their life to family and home. They were not encouraged to obtain education or obtain a higher professional career. Also women were in a position of subjection. The basic law in United States was common law of England and under that law women were considered inferior to ...

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