Essay about Women's Battles in "The Midwife Addresses the Newly Delivered Woman"

Essay about Women's Battles in "The Midwife Addresses the Newly Delivered Woman"

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In the poem titled "The Midwife Addresses the Newly Delivered Woman" the author portrays the strengths and fortune of an Aztec woman she must have while giving birth to a child. The author mentions how the courageous and brave woman went through hard exhausting physical labor. The poem informs the mother that possible unpleasant situations may still occur. The new mother is aware and understanding that she has successfully won mastery. Also it is pointed out when women were giving birth it was like a battle, just as painful as the ones men fought in wars.

The tone of this poem is very important. Throughout as I was reading this poem I sensed heartfelt and great concern for the new mother. Also, in this poem one may notice the role of religion that plays in this poem. The author states clearly that the newly delivered mother should give God great recognition and praise and too not think of her self as worthy for the child, it is God whom she needs to give credit to and thanks. This poem shows how during an Aztec woman's success in birthing to a child is a great significant, and grateful event during their culture.

There isn't much information about the Aztec society since they are so long ago, the artwork and poems is most significant because it allows us to reveal some information.

One may notice some characteristics of the author's culture as she puts emphasis on the importance of the period of time a woman goes through during her labor and giving birth to healthy newborn and religion in crediting God.


As the child, it is characterized to be confined, and the mother as a warrior, in the poem it emphasizes how significant fighting and prisoning enemies were in Aztec society. During that time giving birth was very...


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...mpted to put an end to the religious quality of the midwives methods having the opinion to be witchcraft even though the Spaniards themselves were admired the expertise of the midwives. It is recorded and written that some women healers were more talented and knowledgeable than their own European doctors. As the Spaniards began to repress the Aztec religion, they began to prosecute and persecute these women as witches. http://www.plu.edu/~mumperee/women-society/home.html

As I can imagine during this time period in the Aztec society bearing children was an important role in society in order to keep forth their living community. Without having any methods for contraception, at least from my personal assumptions, there were not any available to these women, which puts these women at more risk for pregnancy for those who may not be physically fit to survive labor.

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- In the poem titled " The Midwife Addresses the Newly Delivered Woman" the author portrays the strengths and fortune of an Aztec woman after she has successfully given birth to a child. The author mentions how courageous and brave the woman was while she went through the hard exhausting physical labor. This poem also remarks on the roles of women living in Aztec culture. Also the poem compares the difficulties women faced when giving birth to the hazards men were subject to in the art of warfare....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]

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