The Women 's Empowerment Movement Essay

The Women 's Empowerment Movement Essay

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Disney has a history of imagination and innovation, but a change in times also calls for a change in taste. Old classics like Snow White, Cinderella, and Beauty and the Beast all tell tales of a naïve and helpless damsel in distress, who are often saved by their charming princes. Looking back on such characters, one realizes that these iconic characters are the embodiment of everything the women’s empowerment movement is against. A movement that has drastically changed the views on women in the past decade. Today, women are looked upon as strong, independent, and brilliant individuals. And so, Disney decided to take a path similar to the movement’s with their film, Frozen. Frozen defied many of the industry’s previous stereotypes, such as giving two female characters the lead roles, creating few love interests, and emphasizing on the responsibilities and power of a woman.’
Frozen came out in 2013, and became an instant hit. Since its release, it has raked in more than $1.2 billion around the globe. According to Maria Konnikova, in her article “How Frozen took over the world,” she credits the film’s huge success to its story’s unique and updated approach. Konnikova states that he story does have some traits that are not necessarily new. “Even the strong female lead isn’t completely new—think Mulan and Brave. But “Frozen,” it seems, has something more” (Konnikova, “How Frozen changes the world”). The “something more” Konnikova is referring to here is Elsa, the protagonist/antagonist of the story. After George Bizer, a psychologist, surveyed college students on the matter of Frozen, he came to the conclusion that everyone was able to relate to Elsa’s character. Not only her strength and independence as a woman, but the hardships sh...


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...l all by herself. On the contrary, the only animal companion in the film is Sven, Kristoff’s reindeer sidekick. While previous films have shown their male characters to be independent fighters and female characters to rely on others, Frozen changes this by reversing the roles. The female characters are stronger and less reliant on others, while the male characters have companions, or have the wrong intentions. As Lueke points out, Frozen also takes a satirical approach by mocking Disney’s traditional stories, mainly the part where Anna instantly agrees on marrying Hans, a man she has not even spent a day with. All the characters in the story disagree with Anna’s decision, as would anyone in the real world. Rustad compares this to other stories where relationships between two characters have been rushed, such as those of Aladdin and Jasmine, and Ariel and Prince Eric.

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The Women 's Empowerment Movement Essay

- Disney has a history of imagination and innovation, but a change in times also calls for a change in taste. Old classics like Snow White, Cinderella, and Beauty and the Beast all tell tales of a naïve and helpless damsel in distress, who are often saved by their charming princes. Looking back on such characters, one realizes that these iconic characters are the embodiment of everything the women’s empowerment movement is against. A movement that has drastically changed the views on women in the past decade....   [tags: Gender role, Gender, Woman, Role]

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