William Blake 's Poem, The Lamb And The Tyger Essay

William Blake 's Poem, The Lamb And The Tyger Essay

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The acclaimed poet and artist William Blake is from London where he begins his career as an artist and a painter. He lives most of his life in extreme poverty, although his works are recognized as valuable within his lifetime. His Christian theology begins to form at the date of his little brother’s sudden death from consumption. Blake claims he sees his brother’s spirit rise from his corpse, clapping and dancing with joy. Shortly after this event, Blake begins to work on his acclaimed publication Songs of Innocence which contains the poem The Lamb. This manuscript was shortly followed by what many consider to be the appropriate addition to Blake’s Songs of Innocence; titled Songs of Experience. Closely comparable with The Lamb is the poem The Tyger. William Blake goes from using soft, feminine language in The Lamb to a hard, masculine verbiage in The Tyger. His effective use of symbolism, formatting and metaphor showcases the polarity of these two works which are often studied together. In William Blake’s two poems, The Lamb and The Tyger there is a distinct chronological relationship showing the development of Blake’s theological worldview as it proceeds from a soft naivety to a cynical hardness as he ponders the existential concepts of good and evil.
The Lamb has two stanzas, each containing five rhymed couplets. The use of repetition in the first and last couplet of each stanza makes the lines into a refrain, and helps to give the poem its song-like quality. The soft vowel sounds contribute to this effect, and also suggest the bleating of a lamb or the lisping character of a child’s voice. The speaker in this poem is a child who is both naive and profound. The question the poem asks, “Who made thee?” (731.1) is a sim...


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...Lamb make thee?” This is a deeply psychological exploration of the concept of creative responsibility and of will, and throughout the poem Blake struggles with this thought.
In William Blake’s two poems, The Lamb and The Tyger there is a distinct chronological relationship showing the development of Blake’s theological worldview as it proceeds from a naivety to a cynical hardness as he ponders the existential concepts of good and evil. His closely-held religious beliefs influenced his writing astronomically, and provide some clarity to his mental and emotional state during the writing of these two poems. Blake uses two animals to illustrate the extremes between good and evil, light and dark, happiness and profound sorrow within the world. His poems are still studied today as his queries into the depths of humanity’s joys and sorrows is still relevant today.

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