Essay about Why Were Women So Active?

Essay about Why Were Women So Active?

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Why were women so active in progressivism? What were some of their outlets (means) for political activities?

Women were a crucial part in the progressive movement because it allowed them to expose the troubles that filled the cities, such as poverty, political corruption, and horrible working and living conditions. Women activists largely participated in the settlement house movement, which allowed them a "side door" to the public life. Their involvement installed the women with confidence and gave them skills that helped them fight against the corruption in the cities, which they otherwise would not have been able to do with their inability to vote or hold positions in political office. Literacy clubs also began transforming into discussions on social issues and current events during the women 's club movement, making more inclusive and open clubsfor middle class women. Women 's sole role was considered in the house as a wife and mother, so progressivist justifies their activities but claiming it to be an extension to their duties in the home and not a rejection. With the help of organizations like the Women 's Trade Union League, the National Consumers League, the Children 's Bureau and the Women 's Bureau, women supported moral or "maternal" issues like child labor, disease-ridden tenements, pensions for mothers, and the safety of food products. This gave the female reformers an opportunity in the federal bureaucracy, and helped them advocate and spread their social investigations.
Another large cause that women activists fought for was factory reform, stopping the unhealthy and unsafe factory conditions for overworked and underpaid employees. This was mainly fueled by the Triangle Shirtwaist Company incid...


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...anded the regulatory power of the federal government.

One major law that Roosevelt passed which increased the government ' regulatory powers was the Meat Inspection Act of 1906. This act ordered that meat shipped across state lines would be subject to a federal inspection. This act also made way for the Pure Food and a drug Act of 1906, which prevents the mislabeling of food and pharmaceuticals. The Elkins Act, followed by the more effective Hepburn Act, which sought to give the Interstate Commerce Commission power to regulate railroads. The Elkins Act was created to ban rebates given by railroads to shippers, and the Hepburn Act gave the Interstate Commerce Commission the ability to authorize, nullify, and stipulate rates. These acts were a way for the executive branch to act as an expansive source of regulatory powers for the "good" of the nation.





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