Which Medical Treatments Would You Want Done, Or Refused If Unable? Essay

Which Medical Treatments Would You Want Done, Or Refused If Unable? Essay

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Which medical treatments would you want done, or refused if unable to communicate?
Recently my mother was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer. She never smoked a day in her life, but has been stricken with a fatal disease. I know and understand that we must have a conversation able her heath conditions and what treatments she chooses. My brother and I are not looking forward to having this necessary conversation with our mother. On a personal note, I would like my life to reflect how I lived. With that being said, I don’t want to be a burden on my family. My mother with almost full certainty, will feel the same way.
My family has gone through several of these tough choices. Particularly on my father’s side of the family, my grandmother passed away from breast cancer. She didn’t want to be a burden on the family, she had a do not resuscitate order in-place. On my mother’s side of the family, both grandparents had DNR orders. My choice would also be in line with my grandparents. If I was unable to communicate due to sickness, I don’t want to be a burden on my family. Do not resuscitate me, God will take care of me, his will has been decided.
What can you do to advocate for a more just society that reflects the unique dignity of human life?
The world has devalued human life, American has devalued lives as well. I am an African American male in American, and sometimes I feel less than a human being. Dr. Robert George’s comments about the Dredd Scott decision that ruled that African Americans, although human beings, do not have the full rights as human beings. While the civil rights act of 1964 outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, we still have problems with human dignity in America.
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...very predictable reactions from elementary students. The child must understand that other children may not understand their differences, but that they really mean no harm. As a matter of fact, most children are more curious to their special needs, than see them a “special.” Finalizing my lesson I would teach all the children that we are all human beings, created in God’s image, Genesis 1:27 “So God created humans to be like himself; he made men and women.”
The primary message of this lesson is that every human life has value and dignity.
To sum up the entire lesson, human life has value as seen in God eyes. God created all humans in his image. Life is precious no matter what age, race, disability, or nationality. We honor God by accepting each other as his creation, in his likeness. There is no devaluation of the human being, we were all put here to do God’s will.

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