What Did I Sign Up For? Essay example

What Did I Sign Up For? Essay example

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At the beginning of this class, students were warned about coming into this class with a certain mindset. Students were warned not to have the preconception of thinking that COMS 201 would teach them how to manipulate others into doing what they wanted. Guilty of this mindset I attempted to trick myself into thinking that I did not have that mindset. Getting through the first few modules on theory was difficult. I remember asking myself, “What did I sign up for?”. After getting through the first few modules I began to enjoy what I was learning, so much so, I caught myself referencing what I had learned in COMS 201 in other aspects of my life. Not before too long all of the modules became hard to keep track of in my head; thus, making the journal entries more and more helpful as the semester went on. Reading the journal entries order show reflect the shift in mindset that occurred during the course of this class. This class has provided me with more than what I thought it would: weekly journal entries are considerably helpful tools to analyze how the experience I had and am having, the real life impacts of what we are learning on groups I am involved in; and furthermore, a call to action I can take away from this class. First, I want to start by analyzing the growth that can be seen through my journal entries, moving on to, my own personal journey of adaptive leadership, and finally, reflecting on how I can advance in my growth. Before I can expect to understand where and how my learning will grow I need to understand how my thought process and perspective on leadership has already adjusted.
The journal entries students were required to make each week cataloged the weekly findings of the modules. I found the journal e...


... middle of paper ...


...p classes to come. This class will be impossible to forget as I move forward in complete my minor. I will be using what I have learned in this class still three years from, it is kind of exciting.
I am excited that the semester is nearly over, but I hope I do not forget all of what I have gained this semester, especially in this class. This is the first online class I have taken and it was on the college level. The journal entries were a way of helping me use the tools I acquired in the past to keeping moving forward. Being able to connections and test out what I had discovered in class with a student organization solidified the teachings. But most of all, I cannot allow everything I have learned to be forgotten and that is why I have a strategy in place. Almost no class ends on the last day or the last assignment and this one is certainly not going to.

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