"Weeding" Out Amendment 64 Essay

"Weeding" Out Amendment 64 Essay

Length: 658 words (1.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Colorado voters do not realize how easy they have made it for children to obtain marijuana. When Amendment 64 was passed, an already troublesome condition escalated to a more dangerous level for our youth. School officials are “reporting an increase in marijuana-related incidents in middle and high schools” (Nancy Lofholm). Sadly, parents smoke openly, in front of their children. Now that they can legally obtain one ounce of marijuana, they do not see the need to keep the drugs out of sight. Once in plain sight, kids have more access to marijuana to share or sell with their peers. Easy availability of weed to minors has very harmful effects on the young mind. Amendment 64 needs to be altered to include more stringent controls to keep the drug out of the hands of teenagers.
There is little argument that marijuana has negative long-lasting effects on children. According to Science Daily, “The findings are of particular concern because adolescence is a crucial period for brain development and maturation” (Sciencedaily.com). Most legal users of marijuana deny the evils of pot to the brain. Because of this lack of concern, students feel as though smoking marijuana is a safe and accepted recreational activity. Destroying the minds of our youth cannot be tolerated. In order to protect the future of Colorado, Amendment 64 must be modified. Without changing this poorly written amendment, schools are being burdened with marijuana related problems.
Legalizing marijuana to allow adults to purchase it for recreational use is being directly correlated to an increase of drug use in Colorado’s middle and high schools. Many school and police officials feel that this rise is due to the fact that marijuana is no longer illegal. “’We have seen a ...


... middle of paper ...


...dditional “outta sight – outta mind” provisions must be made to Amendment 64 to help “weed” out the widespread acceptance of marijuana on school grounds.





Works Cited

Ferner, Matt. "Colorado First State In U.S. To Adopt Rules For Legal, Recreational Marijuana." Huffington Post [New York City] 10 Sept 2013, n. pag. Web. 1 Dec. 2013. .
“ Heavy Marijuana Use May Damage Developing Brain In Teens, Young Adults”. sciencedaily.com. Web. 5 Dec 2013. .
Lofholm, Nancy. "Pot problems in Colorado schools increase with legalization Read more: Pot problems in Colorado schools increase with legalization - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_24501596/pot-problems-colorado-schools-increase-legalization

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Fisrt Amendment Analysis: Basic Freedom Essay

- The interpretation of the first amendment has been seen throughout our history and, it had either been incorporated in a manner of conservancy or alteration. The first amendment basically describes what congress was under limited power to and, our basic freedoms. However, the concern was never questioned if the state government can curb those liberties since during the ratification of the bill there was little concern of this even being true. This had proven to be reality later on with the various cases that questioned not only the first, but several other amendments....   [tags: first amendment, amendments, freedom]

Better Essays
617 words (1.8 pages)

Amendments to the Constitution Essay

- The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment]

Better Essays
1302 words (3.7 pages)

The Codification of the Fourth Amendment Essay

- The most difficult problem that arises for the courts because of technology is the codification of the Fourth Amendment to apply to technological change and progress. The vast changes technology brings to surveillance, security, and data collection offer a challenge to courts in classifying these new technologies and monitoring their use within the limits of the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment states that people have the right to be “secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” An influential dissent written by Louis Brandeis contends that the amendment does not simply protect a person’s property but the “right to be let alone.”...   [tags: technologicals change, privacy, amendment]

Better Essays
1212 words (3.5 pages)

The US Constitution: The Difficulty of Adding an Amendment Essay

- The United States Constitution is considered to be more concise as well as much older than the constitutions of other nations worldwide. Although the United States Constitution is mature, there are such a limited number of amendments that have been added to the Constitution since it was created. Only twenty-seven amendments, including the Bill of Rights, have been added to the Constitution since its creation. This is not due to amendments not being suggested, because over eleven thousand amendments have been contemplated; however, this is because the process of adding an amendment to the Constitution is an extremely long and difficult process....   [tags: american history, amendment]

Better Essays
1000 words (2.9 pages)

The Fifth Amendment: Rights of Accused Suspects and Property Owners Essays

- “I plead the Fifth.” This well-known expression is used by an individual who refuses to answer a question that may incriminate him. This phrase references the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights (Brezina 15). The Bill of Rights protects the fundamental rights of Americans, including the rights of free speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion (Teitelbaum 8). The Fifth Amendment in the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of a person accused of committing a crime (Teitelbaum 15)....   [tags: The Fifth Amendment]

Better Essays
2619 words (7.5 pages)

Current Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence Essay

- Introduction The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was drafted by the Framers to protect the right to be free from governmental intrusion. Without a warrant and probable cause, an officer may not enter a home and search it. The use of GPS technology, however, enables the government to collect the same information without ever leaving the office. Thus, GPS based surveillance presents the issue of what protection the Fourth Amendment offers. Current Fourth Amendment jurisprudence offers little protection from warrantless surveillance....   [tags: Fourth Amendment, Rights, United States]

Better Essays
1599 words (4.6 pages)

Essay on The Eighth Amendment

- The 8th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, as well as the setting of excessive bail or the imposition of excessive fines. However, it has also been deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States (according to the Eighth Amendment)to inflict physical damage on students in a school environment for the purpose of discipline in most circumstances. The 8th Amendment stipulates that bail shall not be excessive. This is unclear as to whether or not there is a constitutional right to bail, or only prohibits excessive bail, if it is to be granted....   [tags: Eighth Amendment Essays]

Better Essays
1153 words (3.3 pages)

Essay Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy

- Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy Double jeopardy is the prosecution of a person for an offense for which he or she has already been prosecuted. The double jeopardy clause, which is in the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, was designed to protect an individual from being subject to trials and possible convictions more then once for an alleged offense. The idea was not to give the State too much over the individual, this way no individual will be subject to embarrassment, expense, and ordeal against being tried for an alleged offense more then once....   [tags: Law Legal 5th Amendment]

Better Essays
1616 words (4.6 pages)

The Controversy of the Second Amendment of the Constitution Essay

- I. INTRODUCTION: The Second Amendment to the Constitution(Second Amendment) of the United States of America(USA) is one of the most controversial. The Second Amendment specifically grants that, "the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed" The way that an individual interprets the wording of the Second Amendment influences their point of view on who has the right to "keep and bear arms" (Amendment 2). The controversy brought on by the Second Amendment is because the Second Amendment does not clearly define whom "the people" are....   [tags: Bear Arms Second Amendment USA]

Free Essays
997 words (2.8 pages)

4th Amendment Essay

- 4th Amendment In the late 1700's the 4th Amendment was written because of strong objections to the Writs of Assistance or general warrants. The Writs Assistance gave officials the right to enter any home and seize belongings without a reasonable cause. (Grolier Encyclopedia) The 4th amendment was ratified in the Bill of Rights on December 15, 1771. This amendment protects the people's right to privacy and security. (Encarta Online) The Fourth Amendment states, 'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affi...   [tags: Government Constitution Amendments History Essays]

Better Essays
1098 words (3.1 pages)