Wealth in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby Essays

Wealth in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby Essays

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby, Gatsby’s obsessive pursuit of goals suggest that Fitzgerald believe that obsessiveness and constant desires often lead to a wrong psychological impact, destructive of one’s traditions, morals, and would have an unplanned end of the lesson or life.
Past is that puzzle that can be delightful to remember but trying to chase it is like a dog chasing its own tail, and throughout the novel F. Scott Fitzgerald shows how abnormal the minds become when it is still beating in the past.The narrator introducing the main character for the first time, but not countering a verbal conversation but has a sight of him where he “decided to call to him, but for he gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone- he stretched out his arm toward the dark water in a curious way.” (Fitzgerald 20). This caused Gatsby to have the motive of reach out for the past before he met the sources that led to his goal or love of his life Daisy Buchanan. As a result his ego and his anxiety increases to a point where he tries to grab more than fate wrote for both of them, and when the person or thing have moved on or belongs to someone else then it is never too late to move on with your life. Gatsby stretched out his arm towards the green light; minute or far way, that was the dock of Daisy’s house. Along the same line the light does not represent the past but it was a light of hope for Gatsby that Fitzgerald convey that even it is across the bay he tends to try to reach for her even its physically impossible to do. Hence the disillusionment is what Fitzgerald is trying to convey that if a mind is still living in the past then it disarrays from the present along with the future. “His [Gatsby] tragedy lies in the ...


... middle of paper ...


...uture not about the past. So in order to have a virtuous life one needs to forget the past, live in the present, and work for the future.
Work Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
Will, Barbara. "The Great Gatsby and the obscene word." College Literature 32.4 (2005): 125+. Literature Resource Center. Web. 18 Feb. 2014.
Trask, David F. "A Note on Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby." University Review 33.3 (Mar. 1967): 197-202. Rpt. in Novels for Students. Ed. Diane Telgen. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Literature Resource Center. Web. 18 Feb. 2014.
Bloom, Harold, ed. Modern Critical Views- F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1986. Print.
Bloom, Harold, ed. Modern Critical Interpretations- F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1986. Print.

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