The War On Drugs Movement Essay

The War On Drugs Movement Essay

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According to the Center of Disease Control fact sheet, “In fiscal year 2016, states will collect $25.8 billion from tobacco taxes and legal settlements but will only spend $468 million—less than 2%—on prevention and cessation programs.” With huge profit margins like these, it is no wonder why American leaders have sparred huge tobacco industries from anti-drug lobbyists; while they target other less historically favorable drugs such as heroin or meth amphetamine. The war on drugs movement has become a classic story of good versus evil, targeting big time drug organizations both nationwide and overseas. However, tobacco use and products should be illegal and banned from the United States as well.
In order to understand why tobacco must be made illegal, we must first understand what it is and how it became entwined in American culture. Tobacco originates from the western hemisphere but has rapidly became major cash crop, funneling to billion-dollar tobacco industries who pump cigarettes, dips, and pipes into communities all around the world. According to the “West 's Encyclopedia of American Law” written by Ed Shirelle Phelps and Jeffrey Lehman, “The use of tobacco for other than medicinal purposes was controversial: The Puritans in America believed that tobacco was a dangerous narcotic. Nevertheless, chewing and smoking tobacco became increasingly popular. (Pg.41)” It comes to no surprise that in today’s society the dangers of tobacco use go acknowledged being that they had been ignored throughout history. Although tobacco had been in America since Christopher Columbus first landed in Plymouth rock, it wasn’t until the early 1920’s that tobacco would become permanently embedded in American life. Around late 70’s through the 80’s ...


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...e health and wellness benefits instead of taking one puff closer to death.
Still to date, tobacco products remain the leading cause of preventable death in America. Yet the tobacco industry remains victorious in protecting itself from regulation while exploiting Americans for profit. Anti-tobacco organizations continue to fight for government action in the regulation of tobacco in combination with efforts to save millions smokers from lifelong addiction and dependency. If anti-drug lobbyists took aim at tobacco, millions of American smokers would have no choice but to quit, and millions more would never start. Tobacco related diseases and illnesses will diminish leaving more funding for cancer research advances, saving many more lives. If the war on drugs lobby’s mission is to reduce drug use and the great damage that it causes, then tobacco should be no exemption.


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