The War On Drugs And Its Effects On The United States Essay

The War On Drugs And Its Effects On The United States Essay

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For almost two decades, the countries of the United Nations have emphasized ‘zero tolerance’ and punishment based policies associated with the prohibition of use, possession, production and trafficking of illicit drugs (Shift Toward More Flexible, Treatment-focused).
The goal in this was to eventually have a “completely drug-free world”. Unfortunately, the policies being enforced have resulted in serious issues over the years. Mass incarceration has skyrocketed, the rapid spread of HIV and Hepatitis C linked with injection drugs has increased dramatically, and the lack of substance abuse treatment has caused serious societal and human health affects. Since the war on drugs was declared by President Nixon in 1971, drug policies
in the United States have remained basically the same. However, in recent years we have seen
a shift as states have begun to legalize marijuana. This brings us to question whether or not the United States is violating the international treaties on drug policy as stated previously.
Drug policies have clearly been rigorous up until now, but much has changed in the
drug policy debate because the reality is that the ‘war on drugs’ has failed, and has instead brought devastating impacts to individuals and communities worldwide. For this very
reason, politicians are starting believe that the United States, as well as other countries around

the world, should take part in more flexible and treatment focused drug policies (Mackey).
International outlooks on drug policies have suggested that these policies be shaped by
science and compassion rather than the public hysteria surrounded by the initial beliefs of
the war on drugs. In 2009, Mexico enacted a law known as “ley de narcomenudo”, or Small-Scale Drug...


... middle of paper ...


...mits currently being applied to the policies related to drugs are
not a way of helping the problem at hand. While I do believe there should be some
discretion when dealing with drug abuse, there should be more of a focus to end the war on
drugs that has caused such a huge amount of damage to individuals and communities as a whole. Illicit drug use needs to be reframed from what has been engrained in us due to the war on
drugs. The decriminalization, to a point, needs to be a pathway for people to accept drug abuse as something that needs to be taken care of in less harsh way. The media needs to cover safe options and support the healing process of those who are affected by drug use. The goal
should be to limit the supply of these illicit drugs and reduce the demand, while also
providing treatment to ensure good health to those trying to conquer drug addiction.

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The War On Drugs And Its Effects On The United States Essay

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