Essay on Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: Women and Fiction

Essay on Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: Women and Fiction

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Many female writers see themselves as advocates for other creative females to help find their voice as a woman. Although this may be true, writer Virginia Woolf made her life mission to help women find their voice as a writer, no gender attached. She believed women had the creativity and power to write, not better than men, but as equals. Yet throughout history, women have been neglected in a sense, and Woolf attempted to find them. In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, she focuses on what is meant by connecting the terms, women and fiction. Woolf divided this thought into three categories: what women are like throughout history, women and the fiction they write, and women and the fiction written about them. When one thinks of women and fiction, what they think of; Woolf tried to answer this question through the discovery of the female within literature in her writing.
Virginia Woolf
Throughout her life Virginia Woolf became increasingly interested in the topic of women and fiction, which is highly reflected in her writing. To understand her piece, A Room of One’s Own Room, her reader must understand her. Born in early 1882, Woolf was brought into an extremely literature driven, middle-class family in London. Her father was an editor to a major newspaper company and eventually began his own newspaper business in his later life. While her mother was a typical Victorian house-wife. As a child, Woolf was surrounded by literature. One of her favorite pastimes was listening to her mother read to her. As Woolf grew older, she was educated by her mother, and eventually a tutor. Due to her father’s position, there was always famous writers over the house interacting with the young Virginia and the Woolf’s large house library.
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...self, but yet also strengthens her argument. Woolf’s experience with mental illness may have led to this distinct style, as she saw writing as a way to express and explore her mania depression.
[Talk more about style?]
Mary’s journey begins on her visit to “Oxbridge,” where she Woolf is said to give her lecture on “Women and Fiction.” Woolf then provides the reader and Mary with her thesis: a women must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction (1). At this point, Mary is sitting at the edge of a pond at “Oxbridge,” a fictional university meant to suggest a combination of the names Oxford and Cambridge, two major British Universities. Mary begins to think about the projected thesis statement, when she is interrupted by a beadle (security guard). He informs her that women are not allowed to sit in the area unless accompanied by a male student.

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