Virginia Woolf 's Style Of A Room Of One 's Own And Three Guineas Essay

Virginia Woolf 's Style Of A Room Of One 's Own And Three Guineas Essay

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Virginia Woolf Essay
Through her texts, Virginia Woolf is able to challenge the injustices she perceived within her society, yet her arguments endure and encourage her audience to question injustices within their own unique contexts.The audience is able to reach valuable understandings about the way Woolf perceived injustices within her context, a period of change for the roles of women, through the construction, content, and language of A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas. Both texts aim to challenge ideas and encourage change in the social structures of their individual contexts, yet remain relevant even within the present day.

Woolf uses a Modernist stream-of-consciousness style throughout the novel; this allows Woolf to confront a variety of values and ideas, strengthening her argument as her audience contemplates both Woolf’s contextual injustices and their own. Woolf uses an extended metaphor of fishing to acknowledge the distractedness of her text at its beginning: “How small, how insignificant this thought of mine looked; the sort of fish that a good fisherman puts back in the water.” Woolf’s ability to view things from varying contexts and perspectives through this style is acknowledged in the final chapter as being a positive skill for a writer: “Clearly the mind is always altering its focus, and bring the world into different perspectives.” This stream-of-consciousness style allows Woolf to consider various contexts, values and ideas, and encourages the reader to do the same.

AROO is a direct appeal to Woolf’s society written as a lecture presented to female students at Newnham and Girton Colleges, those most affected by the injustices Woolf is referring to - that is, the role of women in education. Despite this, AR...


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...e money from writing: “When a brain seller has sold her brain, it’s anaemic, vicious, and diseased progeny are let loose upon the world to infect and corrupt and sow the seeds of disease in others”. Woolf’s use of visual imagery strengthens her argument against the injustices she perceives as affecting women.

These texts challenge injustices perceived by Woolf within her society, yet the arguments endure and encourage her audience to question injustices within their own unique contexts. Through reading these texts, the audience is able to reach valuable understandings about Woolf’s contextual injustices, and are urged to consider their own, due to Woolf’s use of an array of fiction and non-fiction elements within these essays. Woolf’s passionate and insightful argument certainly remains relevant today, both when reviewing history and considering our present context.

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