Violence, Power, and Goals in the Hebrew Bible and The Iliad Essay

Violence, Power, and Goals in the Hebrew Bible and The Iliad Essay

Length: 1349 words (3.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Violence is a means to an end. Violence is not something most humans resort to for enjoyment. Violence is, however, the right thing to be done in certain situations. With violence, comes great power. Power and violence walk together, hand in hand. When violence is exhibited, the power of the individual is shown to those around him. In both the Hebrew Bible and The Iliad, violence is depicted as a mode to reach goals. The reason for this is that violence allows an individual or a deity to flaunt their powers, while they simultaneously achieve their personal and communal ambitions.
Just like how mortals have their own goals, deities also have an agenda. God, in the Hebrew Bible, has only two goals: to have humans obey Him blindly and to punish them if they disobey Him. In order to execute both of His plans, God uses violence. In Exodus 32, the Israelites who escaped Egypt insulted God by "making themselves a molten calf and bowing low to it and sacrificing to it" (Exodus 32:8), as well as claiming the calf to be the one who brought them out of Egypt (Exodus 32:4). By worshipping the idol of the calf, the Israelites had turned away from God. Because the Israelites disobeyed God, He ended up pursuing his other goal, to punish the people who disobeyed Him. Because of the Israelites' foolish act, God chose to inflict pain on them: "then the Lord sent a plague upon the people, for what they did with the calf that Aaron made" (Exodus 32:35). Since God never once appeared in front of humans as a man, the only way for the Israelites to experience God's anger and disappointment, and ultimately the power he yields, is through His physical punishment: the plague. Also, vice versa, the plague was the physical representation God needed in orde...


... middle of paper ...


...t all the Trojan men will be fighting for their beloved Troy, too keep her from tumbling. The Trojans had no choice except to fight. They had to use violence to achieve the goal of the people. They must use all the power in their mights to defend their only home. If they don't they will exhibit a weakness, in which the Greeks will then take for granted. Violence, once again, is a necessity in reaching a common goal of a city that is under attack.
Violence, although at times is morally wrong, is sometimes the best way to solve a problem, to reach a goal. Because violence is an exhibition of a man's powers, violence allow an individual to show his might and his prowess. Therefore, both violence and power are attributed to an individual's or society's ability to achieve what they yearn to accomplish.


Works Cited

Homer's Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles
The Tanakh

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Women in Iliad, Odyssey, and the Bible

- Role of Women in Iliad, Odyssey, and the Bible Much is known of men in ancient civilizations, from the famous philosophers and mathematicians of Greece to the patriarchs and subsequent kings of the nation of Israel. It would seem, however, that history has forgotten the women of these times. What of the famous female thinkers of Ancient Greece, the distinguished stateswomen of Rome. What power did they hold. What was their position in societies of the distant past. A glimpse into the roles and influence of women in antiquity can be discovered in such ancient masterpieces as the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Hebrew Bible....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

Better Essays
1539 words (4.4 pages)

Analysis Of The Epic Of Gilgamesh, The Iliad, And The Aeneid Essay

- 1. Discuss how god/goddess intervention plays a key role in three of the stories. Include the god/goddess ' actions and the significance/effects of this action. a. Gods and goddesses intervention plays a key role in many of the stories, including The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Iliad, and The Aeneid. Apollo, god of sun and art, intervenes multiple times in The Iliad. He is known for sending the plague to the Greeks. Aruru, goddess of creation, made Gilgamesh and Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh. Aeolus, god of wind, is persuaded by Juno, goddess of marriage, to build a storm....   [tags: Epic of Gilgamesh, Epic poetry, Ishtar, Bible]

Better Essays
1131 words (3.2 pages)

Comparison of the Gods in Homer’s Epics with the God of the Hebrews Essay examples

- There are many similarities and differences between the Greek gods and the Hebrew God. These similarities and differences are revealed in the character and functionality of the gods. The revelation of similarities and differences can also be seen in man’s relationship to his god or gods. Homer was instrumental in documenting the oral traditions of the Greek gods in his poetry. Moses, the Hebrew leader, is attributed with documenting what he witnessed from God in the Torah. The Greek and Hebrew belief systems were established for the purposes of explaining the world we live in, the phenomenon in nature, and the existence and purpose of man....   [tags: Greek Gods, Hebrew God]

Better Essays
3011 words (8.6 pages)

Essay about The Hebrew Bible And The Bible

- The Hebrew Bible contains conflicting and insufficient information, which impacts my views about what the Hebrew Bible says and what the Bible means. It has multiple dimensions. It is evident that various scriptures in the Hebrew Bible do not say what it means, nor does it mean what it says. “Ultimately it 's going to take some detective work in an effort to increase findings to enhance interpretation and more.” [6] I feel that portions of the Hebrew Bible should be modified, re-investigated, re-instated and re-interpreted to include all God 's people, of all nationalities and religions in fairness and justice....   [tags: Bible, Old Testament, Hebrew Bible, Tanakh]

Better Essays
778 words (2.2 pages)

The Portrayal Of Yahweh And The Hebrew Bible Essay

- 1: The portrayal of Yahweh or Jehovah in the Hebrew Bible differs from the portrayal of other gods in the ancient world primarily in the character 's essential mysteriousness. Outline some examples of that mystery and how it affects the human beings who revere God. Just as God creates a companion for Adam because “it is not good for the human to be alone”, the reader can assume that such a need for company applies to God as well (Genesis 160). God “created the human in his image”, perhaps to serve as sort of companion to God himself (Genesis 159)....   [tags: Iliad, Greek mythology, Jacob, Trojan War]

Better Essays
1083 words (3.1 pages)

Essay on Comparing Biblical And Of Hebrew Bible Creation

- Midterm Essay Question 1: Near-Eastern Creation vs. Hebrew Bible Creation The creation narratives found in the Hebrew Bible often conflict with one another, but mostly build upon ancient near-eastern understandings of creation. These ancient near-eastern understandings provided a foundation from which the Hebrew narratives could distinguish themselves as a people “set apart” from the mainstream understanding of the world. While many accounts of creation deal with questions of where people came from, how the world was ordered and answers to common questions, the Hebrew Bible accounts offer direct attacks on ancient near-eastern ideologies for the purpose of setting apart the biblical audienc...   [tags: Bible, Israelites, Creation myth, Supersessionism]

Better Essays
1574 words (4.5 pages)

Hebrew Nomads View on the Creation Essay

- ... This is the story the Babylonians would have believed in when they heard Genesis. Genesis starts by saying “in beginning God created the heavens and the earth”. The Bible talks about God speaking things into existence. First God made the light, which He separated into day and night. Next, God created the sky and then the waters. “He called the dry ground ‘land’ and the waters ‘seas’”. This is when God says that “it was good”. God states that his creations are good, which is different from the creations of Enuma Elish....   [tags: Genesis, Hebrew, Bible]

Better Essays
1165 words (3.3 pages)

The Hebrew Bible Essay

- (1) Name and define the three sections of the Hebrew Bible and explain how each section separately and collectively influence the Jewish people. The Hebrew Bible or the Tanak is a collection of sacred literature that profoundly influences the Jewish people. Composed of numerous books, its origins span back to 90 CE, where the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, forced the Jewish people to scribe the traditions of their temple-based religion. Much of what has been scribed was previously passed down orally through sermons and rituals within the temple, but with no temple, and no way practice their beliefs, a canon had to be agreed upon for Judaism to survive....   [tags: Judaism, Torah, Moses, Book of Genesis]

Better Essays
1813 words (5.2 pages)

Essay The Hebrew Bible

- (1) Name and define the three sections of the Hebrew Bible and explain how each section separately and collectively influence the Jewish people. The Hebrew Bible or the Tanak is a collection of sacred literature that profoundly influences the Jewish people. Composed of numerous books, its origins span back to 90 CE, where the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, forced the Jewish people to scribe the traditions of their temple-based religion. Much of what has been scribed was previously passed down orally through sermons and rituals within the temple, but with no temple, and no way practice their beliefs, a canon had to be agreed upon for Judaism to survive....   [tags: Judaism, Torah, Book of Genesis, Tanakh]

Better Essays
715 words (2 pages)

Relationship Between God And Greek Gods Essay

- Upon initial examination, the relationship between human beings and the divine in the Bible and the Iliad is one that is complex and consequential. However, while the importance of the relationship between a human being and the divine is demonstrated in both the Iliad and the Bible, the relationship between God and human is viewed very differently. On the surface, the Hebrew God and the Greek gods have the same purpose, to reign above the mortal realm. Yet, the way in which these Gods communicate and interact with mortals is not alike at all....   [tags: Bible, God, Torah, Apollo]

Better Essays
1652 words (4.7 pages)