Free Essays on A Doll's House: An Essay

Free Essays on A Doll's House: An Essay

Length: 1872 words (5.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓
A Doll House


A Doll House was one of Henrik Ibsen's most controversial plays. He wrote this realistic play in 1879. Ibsen's writing style of realism was clearly shown in this play. This play was controversial at the time it was written, shocking conservative readers. But, at the same time, the play served as a rallying point for supporters of a drama with different ideas.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Art Nouveau style became an international movement. For the first time in decorative arts history there was a simultaneous movement throughout Europe and America. Art Nouveau brought the finest designers and craftsmen together in order to design buildings, furniture, wallpaper, fabrics, ceramics, metalwork and glasswork. Art Nouveau was considered more than a style, it was a philosophy. From this philosophy carefully designed articles for the home were designed intended to fit into the scheme of the whole Art Nouveau style. Line was the most important aspect of the Art Nouveau period. Art Nouveau was a rebellion against machine made articles of the 19th century that were copies of past designs. Art Nouveau was also a reaction against the old Victorian tradition. Art Nouveau designers borrowed from the past but because of the emphasis on line and adaptation of natural forms to design. Art Nouveau is easily distinguishable from any other period in decorative arts.

In conjunction with Art Nouveau style, the Edwardian style of costume and dress was also implemented during this time period. The Edwardian style embodied both extravagance and pageantry.

A Doll House was a play written well ahead of its time. This play was written in a time when it was considered an outrage for a woman such as Nora not only to display a mind of her own, but also to leave her husband in order to obtain her freedom. This play relates to the Art Nouveau and Edwardian period because just as the furniture and clothing were considered decorative pieces, so were women. Women were expected only to tend to the husband's and children's needs. Women were not supposed to do anything without first consulting the husband and certainly never do anything without his prior knowledge and approval. Women were expected to be at home and always looking presentable for their husbands.

*Please note all visual elements for this term paper can be viewed at the conclusion of this project.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Free Essays on A Doll's House: An Essay." 123HelpMe.com. 25 Jun 2019
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=9646>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Free Essays on A Doll's House: Breaking Away

- Breaking Away in A Doll's House The central theme of A Doll's House is secession from society. It is demonstrated by several of its characters breaking away from the social standards of their time and acting on their own terms. No one character demonstrates this better than Nora. During the time in which the play took place society frowned upon women asserting themselves. Women were supposed to play a role in which they supported their husbands, took care of their children, and made sure everything was perfect around the house....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Free Essays
552 words (1.6 pages)

Free Essays on A Doll's House: An Essay

- A Doll House A Doll House was one of Henrik Ibsen's most controversial plays. He wrote this realistic play in 1879. Ibsen's writing style of realism was clearly shown in this play. This play was controversial at the time it was written, shocking conservative readers. But, at the same time, the play served as a rallying point for supporters of a drama with different ideas. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Art Nouveau style became an international movement. For the first time in decorative arts history there was a simultaneous movement throughout Europe and America....   [tags: Dolls House essays]

Free Essays
1872 words (5.3 pages)

Free Essays on A Doll's House: Money Matters

- A Doll's House Essay: Money Matters Henrik Ibsen was born in 1828 to a wealthy family, however, when he was just eight years old his family went bankrupt, and they lost their status in society. Ibsen knew how the issue of money could destroy a person’s reputation in no time at all. Perhaps that is how he makes the characters in his play, A Doll's House , so believable. Nora and Mrs. Linde, the two main female characters in the play, have had the issues of money and forgery ruin their lives. Nora forged her dead father’s signature to get a loan....   [tags: Dolls House essays]

Free Essays
655 words (1.9 pages)

Free Essay - Mrs. Linde and Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House

- A Doll’s House Essay: Mrs. Linde and Nora       After reading  “A Doll’s House” by Hendrik Ibsen. I can conclude that there is both a parallel and a contrast structure in the characters of Mrs. Linde and Nora. A contrasting difference in the characters, are shown not in the characters themselves, but the role that they play in their marriages. These women have different relationships with their husbands. Torvald and Nora have a relationship where there is no equality. To Torvald Nora is an object....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Free Essays
551 words (1.6 pages)

Free Essays on A Doll's House: Marital Lessons

- Marital Lessons from A Doll's House Divorce has become widely accepted throughout the world. In today's world, the violent shredding of a family is shrugged off like the daily weather. The Norwegian play A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, is a prime example of a marriage that didn't work. The marriage of Torvald and Nora Helmer had many problems because the husband and wife couldn't discover the secrets of marital bliss. To keep a marriage alive and growing it must hold true to four qualities: love, communication, trust and loyalty, and perseverance....   [tags: Dolls House essays]

Free Essays
1298 words (3.7 pages)

Free Essay - Nora in Act 1 in Ibsen's A Doll's House

- The Character of Nora in Act 1 of A Doll's House The character of Nora, of Isben's A Doll's House, is particularly difficult to interpret. Her character is constructed by the combination of a number of varying traits.   Throughout Act 1 her ambiguity is particularly prominent. Her frivolous, playful moments are readily followed by moments of practicality and astuteness. It is not surprising that Nora is such a changeable character for she is constantly interchanging between three main roles: a supporting wife, fundamental mother and sexual being....   [tags: Dolls House essays]

Free Essays
582 words (1.7 pages)

How do both The Stranger by Albert Camus and A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen explore free will?

- From the very first line of Albert Camus’ The Stranger, “Maman died today,” (Camus 3) the quirky character of Meursault is shown to be different. The same holds true with Henrik Ibsen’s classic play, A Doll’s House, concerning Nora, a mother who abandons her family in order to pursue her own happiness. Both characters, while set in opposing societies, exhibit similar characteristics: a courageous, if not reckless, pursuit of happiness, be it physical in the case of Meursault or mental for Nora, and the relentless disregard of social standards and norms in the chase for free will....   [tags: Literature]

Research Papers
1644 words (4.7 pages)

Henrik Isben's A Doll's House Essay

- A Doll’s House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, tells the story of Nora, the wife of Torvald Helmer, who is an adult living as a child, kept as a doll by her husband. She is expected to be content and happy living in the world Torvald has created for her. By studying the play and comparing and contrasting the versions presented in the video and the live performance, one can analyze the different aspects of it. Ibsen’s purpose for writing this piece is to entertain while pointing out an injustice....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Research Papers
1480 words (4.2 pages)

Essay about A Doll House By Henrik Ibsen

- Nora’s Story; Her Big Click Woman were thought to be nothing more than an accessory to men. However, in the play “A Doll House” by Henrik Ibsen we are introduced to the main character, Nora, who changed the way many women would view themselves not only in their marriage but as well as in society. In many cases, it is clear to see how men might be holding woman back and in this play we see the different obstacles she has to go through that lead her to her final decision. Nora goes to show that woman can be much more than they offer even without men in their life....   [tags: Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House, Norway]

Research Papers
1829 words (5.2 pages)

Henrik Isben's A Doll's House Essay

- In many literary works, there are characters in which portray both similarities and differences. In the Play "A Doll's House," by Henrik Ibsen, two of the characters have many oppositions and congruencies. These characters go by the names of Nora Helmer and Mrs. Linde. Ibsen characterizes these women by describing their comparable and contrasting personalities. He does this by describing their financial situations as well as their family lives. He describes these women, as opposites while in fact there are some distinct similarities....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Research Papers
730 words (2.1 pages)

Related Searches



Scenery plot

In this play A Doll House, the entire play takes place in Nora and Torvald's apartment. All of the three acts take place in the same apartment therefore scenery is not a major aspect of the play. The apartment set up goes as follows: there is a back wall, there are two doors, the door to the right leads out to the hall while the door to the left leads to Torvald's study. In the middle of the left-hand wall is a door with a window on its nearer side. In the wall on the right-hand side, somewhat to the back, is a door. The floor is carpeted.

Costume plot

1) Torvald Helmer in Act One is dressed like a businessman wearing a waistcoat. Later in the act, he is wearing an overcoat and hat as he leaves the apartment. In Act Two, Torvald Helmer is wearing the same attire as in Act One. In Act Three, Torvald is wearing a black coat and evening attire.

2) Dr. Rank in Act One he is dressed in business attire with a fur coat on top. In Act Two, Dr. Rank is wearing the same attire as in Act One. In Act Three, Dr. Rank is wearing evening attire.

3) Nils Krogstad in Act One is wearing business attire. In Act Two, Krogstad is wearing traveling clothes, high boots and a fur cap. In Act Three, Krogstad is wearing the same clothes as in Act Two.

4) Porter who is only seen in Act One is wearing gray pants with a dark jacket, and a dark coat with a matching dark cap and gloves.

5) Nora Helmer in Act One is wearing street clothes which consists of a long dress with side pockets, a coat, gloves, and a hat covering her head. In Act Two, Nora is wearing the same clothes as in Act One. In Act Three, Nora is seen first in her Italian costume with a black shawl. Later in the act, she is wearing Torvald's coat and then changes into a dress. As the act ends, she is wearing a coat and a hat.

6) Mrs. Kristine Linde in Act One is wearing traveling clothes - a long cape-like coat, a scarf and bonnet type hat. In Act Two, Mrs. Linde is seen in the same clothes as in Act One. In Act three, Mrs. Linde is wearing traveling clothes, hat and cape.

7) Helen, the maid, is wearing a long black sleeved dress, with a long white apron on top in Act one. She is wearing the same clothes in Act Two and does not appear in Act three of the play.

8) Anna -Marie appears only in Act One and Two in which she is wearing a long, plain house dress.

Properties Plot

Scenery pieces for Act One: Nora and Torvald's apartment is an inexpensive but comfortably furnished room. In the back wall, there are two separate doors. The door to the right leads out to a hallway while the door to the left leads to Torvald's study. Between the two doors, there is a piano. In the middle of the left-hand wall is a window with a door adjacent to it. Next to the window is a small sofa and a round table covered with cloth. Armchairs are located next to the round table. In the wall on the right-hand side, is a door. A lit tiled stove is also located in the right-hand side wall with easy chairs and a rocking chair in front of it. Between where the stove is located and the wall, there is a small table standing. A cabinet with china ornaments and a small bookcase with fine bound books can also be seen in the room.

Act Two takes place in the same room as Act One. A stripped Christmas tree with the remains of the burnt-out candles is standing in a corner by the piano.

Act Three takes place in the same room as Act One and Act Two. The chairs and the table have been relocated to the middle of the room. A lit lamp is standing on the table. The door that leads to the hallway is open and dancing music can be heard from the apartment located above.

Hand props:

Following are the hand props necessary in Act One.

Nora's hand props are an armful of packages, a purse and money, a bag of macaroons, needlework, Christmas decorations which consist of red flowers and candles. The armful of packages are Christmas gifts that include a children's suit, a toy sword, a toy horse, dress lengths, a trumpet, a doll, a doll's bed, handkerchiefs, and a parcel.

The delivery boy's hand props are a Christmas tree and a basket.

Torvald's hand props consist of a pen, a wallet and money, and a bundle of papers.

Nils' only hand prop is a piece of paper.

In Act Two, the succeeding hand props are needed:

Nils' hand prop is a letter.

A cardboard box carried by the nurse.

Mrs. Linde's hand props include needle and cotton and the dress that Nora is going to perform in.

The maid's hand prop is a lamp and a business card.

Nora's props are the dress that she will be performing in, flesh-colored silk stockings, a tambourine and a long colored shawl.

Torvald's hand props are a bundle of papers and a letter.

The hand props necessary for Act Three are:

Mrs. Linde's hand props are a book and some knitting.

Nora's hand props are a match, bag, keys and wedding ring

Torvald's hand props are keys, a cigar case, letters and a bond paper.

Dr. Rank's only hand prop is a cigar which he is smoking.

After researching all the necessary mechanics of putting on a production of a play such as a A Doll House, I have come to realize how much work needs to be completed in order to accurately depict the time period that is chosen for the production. Originally I had no concept of what was necessary to produce such a play, but after completing this term project, I now have an understanding of how important the research part of the play affects how well the production can be presented to an audience.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Guerrand, Roger-Henri. "The Birth of a Modern Style." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 13.

2. Garner, Philippe. "Furniture and Interior Design." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 62.

3. Garner, Philippe. "Furniture and Interior Design." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 63.

4. Haslam, Malcolm. "Alternative Styles and Tastes." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 44

5. Laver, James. Costume and Fashion: A Concise History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969: 207.

6. Byrde, Penelope. A Visual History of Costume: The Twentieth Century. New York: Drama Book Publishers, 1986: 16.

7. Ronsdorf-Braun, Margarete. Mirror of Fashion: A History of European Costume, 1789-1929. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1964: 142.

8. Bradfield, Nancy. Costume in Detail Women's Dress, 1730-1930. Boston: Plays, Inc., 1968: 256.

9. Ronsdorf-Braun, Margarete. Mirror of Fashion: A History of European Costume, 1789-1929. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1964: 184.

10. Cunnington, Willett C. English Women's Clothing in the Nineteenth Century. London: Faber and Faber Ltd., 1937: 373.

11. Ronsdorf-Braun, Margarete. Mirror of Fashion: A History of European Costume, 1789-1929. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1964: 116.

12. Ronsdorf-Brau, Margarete. Mirror of Fashion: A History of European Costume, 1789-1929. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1964: 148.

13. Ewing, Elizabeth. History of Twentieth Century Fashion. Maryland: Barnes & Noble Books, 1974: 64.

14. Cunnington, Willett C. English Women's Clothing in the Nineteenth Century. London: Faber and Faber Ltd., 1937: 385.

15. Wichmann, Siegfried. Jugendstil Art Nouveau. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984: 221.

16. Wichmann, Siegfried. Jugendstil Art Nouveau. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984: 159.

17. Klein, Dan, and Margaret Bishop. Decorative Art, 1880-1980. Oxford: Phaidon.Christie's Limited, 1986: 106.

18. Garner, Philippe. "Furniture and Interior Design." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 58.

19. Haslam, Malcolm. "Alternative Styles and Tastes." In Philippe Garner, ed. The Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts, 1890-1940. Cincinnati: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1978: 43.

20. Klein, Dan, and Margaret Bishop. Decorative Art, 1880-1980. Oxford: Phaidon.Christie's Limited, 1986: 66.

21. Klein, Dan, and Margaret Bishop. Decorative Art, 1880-1980. Oxford: Phaidon.Christie's Limited, 1986: 107.

22. Wichmann, Siegfried. Jugendstil Art Nouveau. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984: 158.

23. Wichmann, Siegfried. Jugendstil Art Nouveau. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984: 118.

24. Wichmann, Siegfried. Jugendstil Art Nouveau. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1984: 81.
Return to 123HelpMe.com