William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

Length: 2599 words (7.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓
Content Conference Guidelines

1.     Keep an eye on the clock and remember you’re responsible to all the writers in the room. At first, as a teacher gets the hand of conferring, conferences may run longer than you wish. But it is important to remember that you are not asking to hear every single word every student writes. Instead, ask kids to tell you about the writing - what it is about and what is happening. Ask them to read or talk to you about the lead, a section that’s working well, or a part they need help with. Skim students’ drafts-just be sure to focus on content and craft, not conventions. When teachers begins with long conferences, individual writers will come to count on this level of attention and will not learn how to identify and solve problems. Worse, the teacher will be able to meet with just a handful of kids each day.

2.     Meet with as many writers as possible each day, and make notes on the status-of-the-class chart of who you did not confer with; see those students first in the next workshop.

3.     Go to your students’ desks, so you can control the length of conferences and the behavior in the classroom and see many writers. Circulate from one area of the room to another.

4.     Make the conference personal and intimate. It should feel like a conversation. This means kneeling or sitting alongside writers as you talk, listen, and read their writings.

5.     Whisper and ask students to whisper when they confer with you and each other. Writers won’t be able to think, compose, or produce if the teacher’s voice is filling their ears and your words are filling their minds. Try not to be a distraction to the other writers in the room, and try to set a tone of quiet concentration: if your volume goes up, the volume in the room will rise to match it.

6.     Strive for a balance between listening to students discuss their writing; listening as they read aloud texts that are relatively brief (e.g., a letter or poem) or passages from longer works; and, after the writer has told you what he or she wants help with, reading their texts silently to yourself.

7.     Some pieces of student writing are too long to listen to or read during class, especially in the upper elementary and secondary grades, as students begin to write extended prose. Ask the writer if you may take the draft home.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." 123HelpMe.com. 24 Jan 2020
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=84349>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Fate And Foreshadowing : William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- In order to draw the reader in and gain their full attention, an author will often use the concepts of fate and foreshadowing. The art of foreshadowing encompasses the idea of showing or indicating an event or events beforehand (Random). Now the author does not always make these hints so clear or blatant. This creates the feel that the reader must go on in order to figure what has been foreshadowed. Fate and foreshadowing are often a joint ideology in Shakespearean writing. Throughout all of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and Julius Caesar, the role of fate and foreshadowing sculpt the plays in their entirety....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare]

Research Papers
1128 words (3.2 pages)

William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- Comparison and Contrast Essay The most widely known William Shakespeare play is "Romeo and Juliet". Since he wrote this play in 1951, there have been many remakes and spins put on his original idea. One of these renditions is a play called "The West Side Story". West Side Story is an energetic, widely-acclaimed musical, a modern-day, loose re-telling of Shakespeare 's Romeo and Juliet tragedy of feuding families. The two stories are similar in a multitude of ways, even though their settings are centuries apart....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, Gang]

Research Papers
1100 words (3.1 pages)

William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- Everybody loves drama. Drama keeps people interested and sucks people in. A good place to start if you want to see an abundance of drama is in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Countless authors have written Shakespeare and whether he should be taught to teenagers. One author, Shelina Zhara Janmohamed, wrote “On Love and War, Iraq Learns From Shakespeare” about how Shakespeare has helped Iraqis and how they connected with Shakespeare. Another author, Stephen Marche wrote “ How Shakespeare Changed Everything” about how Shakespeare had a great impact on the world....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare]

Research Papers
726 words (2.1 pages)

William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- Analysis of Scene 4.4 in Romeo and Juliet What makes scene 4.4 in Romeo and Juliet unique is the way in which the dynamic between the public and the characters is handled. The people in the audience are put in a situation where they know more than the characters on the stage. Apart from the spectators the only other person who knows that Juliet is not actually dead, but just appears to be, is Friar Laurence. Shakespeare is well aware of the possibilities that this situation presents him with and uses them to enhance the scene and give it a second layer of meaning....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare]

Research Papers
1363 words (3.9 pages)

Essay about William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet

- The film Shakespeare In Love is a very complex but straightforward plot. Where William Shakespeare was mandated to compose a play right at the moment when his imagination was minimal. Frustrated and looking for inspiration, he met a beautiful lady with the name of Viola de Lessups bumping his creativity giving birth to the so famous play “Romeo and Juliet.” The set of the events along with the actions Shakespeare and Viola take and the reactions they produce form the narrative of the film a long with the mise-se-scene made out of the movie a hit in Hollywood by capturing the attention of the audience with the combination of different artistic choices....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, Film]

Research Papers
1227 words (3.5 pages)

William Shakespeare 's ' Twelfth Night ' And ' Romeo And Juliet ' Essay

- In the play ‘Twelfth Night’ and ‘Romeo and Juliet’ William Shakespeare explores three different aspects of love. According to the oxford dictionary the definition of love is a strong feeling of affection. The plays that William Shakespeare has written definitely adhere to this definition. These three aspects of love are true love, self love and friendship love. Many characters in these plays are tangled in a web of love and they are oblivious that they 're feeling and emotions towards other characters are not real....   [tags: Love, Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare]

Research Papers
1278 words (3.7 pages)

William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- Romeo and Juliet at Shakespeare to the West Side Story Romeo and Juliet is a remarkable love story that anyone would be excited to know about the scene in Shakespeare’s play that reflects in the play which is love, tragedy, and death. Romeo and Juliet on Shakespeare present many similarities and as well a lot differences to compare the West Side Story. Juliet, shows her greater love for Romeo. Juliet with her strong character resists her parent’s decision by refusing to marry Paris. She decided to listen to her heart....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, Love]

Research Papers
1149 words (3.3 pages)

William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- Shakespeare’s plays were written in the 14th and 15th century in England, yet until this day it still has a huge influence on American English class. Why. Well because Shakespeare has a universal appeal with a rich language, complex characters with a theme that is timeless. Shakespeare should be taught more, one play per semester because it is part of American literature culture, it challenges students reading levels and as it expands students vocabulary and enriches their speaking. Shakespeare plays are relevant today as the themes of the plays involved what teenagers like and experience such as love, betrayal, courage,politics and corruption.The themes can be set in such basic forms that...   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, Literature]

Research Papers
872 words (2.5 pages)

Leadership Failures Of William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet Essay

- The characters that portray leadership in Shakespeare’s plays like dukes, kings, and generals are chaotic at best and are at times questionable in their leading roles. From characters like Duke Vincentio to more subtle rulers like Prince Escalus, all have had their fair share of leadership mishaps which sometimes proved as a huge mistake. Throughout history we are able to analyze the successful rulers and the unsuccessful rulers and the flaws that they did and did not possess compared to others....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare, Prince]

Research Papers
993 words (2.8 pages)

Essay on William Shakespeare 's Romeo And Juliet

- Reading for Pleasure Three Most Important Texts from Semester One Throughout high school, I have had a rather up and down outlook on my literature courses in part because of the texts that are presented to us on the curriculum. In my freshman year of high school our one big text was Romeo and Juliet and while I am more appreciative of William Shakespeare now than I was a freshman, I still do not enjoy Romeo and Juliet in any way shape or form. My sophomore year we read texts I found tolerable such as To Kill A Mockingbird and Julius Caesar, but these were overshadowed by intolerable and droll texts like Cry The Beloved Country....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, Sonnet, William Shakespeare]

Research Papers
1031 words (2.9 pages)

Related Searches

Read it and jot down questions or suggestion on a Post-it. Return the writing to the writer in class the next day and confer about your response.

8.     Build on what writers know and have done, rather than bemoaning what’s not on the page or what’s wrong with what is. Remember: kids usually write as well as they can. As you help them move forward, their best will get better. A piece of writing that isn’t working yet is not working yet; it is not bad.

9.     At the other end of the spectrum, avoid generalized praise. It is a way many teachers were trained to talk-congratulating kids on their opinions, stroking verbally as a reward for desired behavior, deeming everything our kids do “Very good!” - and it is not a way human beings talk to each other. Praise by paying attention to the writer. Praise by becoming involved in the writing. Praise by congratulation writers who solve problems by dint of hard work.
Praise by acknowledging writers who try something new. Praise by describing the effects of specific techniques on you as a reader: “Your lead brought me right into the essay,” or “I like the way you built your argument: it anticipates the way someone who disagrees with you would argue back,” or “The images are so concrete I can close my eyes and see this,” or “I have goosebumps at the way you concluded this.”

10.In questioning students about the content of their writings, ask about what you are curious about. Focus on meaning: What don’t you understand? What doesn’t make sense to you? What would you like to know more about? A string of inquisitions along the line of “When did you go there? Who did you go with? Did you have fun? What kind of day was it? Did you have anything to eat? What?” elicits a string of one-and two-word answers. But a more global question like “Tell me more about X” or “I don’t understand Y” gets a writer thinking and talking.

11.Come prepared to take notes and make notes. You may want to travel, as I do, with a pad of Post-its. Or you might want to adapt the peer writing conference record as a form for you to lean on as you get the hang of the rituals of face-to-face response. You will need a place to jot down your questions and observations so you don’t lose them; to demonstrate solutions to writing problems; and to transcribe for the kids the ideas and plans they describe to you-to serve as recording secretary as they talk about what might happen next.

12.If an occasion arises for you to demonstrate a solution to a problem the writer can not solve, ask permission to draft on the draft. This calls for an especially delicate touch. Don’t take over the piece of writing and make it your own; do confer with the writer about his or her intentions. If you think you understand them and believe you have something to teach, ask if you may demonstrate the technique, approach, or solution on the draft: “May I show you a way to do this.”
13.Be patient. Trust yourself and your students. Over a whole year of conferences, mini lessons, and writing experiences, your students will improve as writers, and you will improve as a responder to writers.



Bi-Weekly Conference Notes                    Date ____________
Student ___________________________     Period ___________
Piece (genre) __________ Title if available ___________________

Where are you in your writing? ______________________________
_____________________________________________________

How can I help you? (Specifics)
__________________________ ___________________________
__________________________ ___________________________
__________________________ ___________________________
Which one or ones do you want help on today? ___________________
Response/s:






One of the greatest strengths of this paper is __________________
_____________________________________________________
Another positive part is ___________________________________
_____________________________________________________
Goal (due by next conference):

Teacher Signature _____________________ Date ___________
Student Signature _____________________
Questions about Purpose
•     Does the writing answer the question, “So what?”
•     Do I have a big idea? Do I have enough specifics to support this theme, argument, or purpose?
•     Is the writing honest?
•     Will it make a reader think and feel?
•     Do I know what I’m talking about?
•     Will readers relate to the writing so strongly that I hold their attention the whole time?

Questions about Information

Is my information sufficient? Is it accurate?

•     Have I told enough? Have I explained each part well enough that a reader will know what I mean, every step of the way?
•     What’s the strongest, most satisfying part, and how can I build on it?
•     Have I described thoughts and feelings at the points where readers will wonder what I am, or what my main character is, thinking and feeling?
•     Have I embedded the context: told where, when, how, what, and with whom?
•     Have I described the scene with enough detail that a reader can see it happening - can envision people in action?
•     Did people talk? Have I directly quoted the words they said? Does it sound the way these people would speak to each other? Can a reader hear what they’re like?
•     Have I created questions in a reader’s mind about where the writing will lead?
•     Have I included specifics that reveal my character, myself, my subject, or my argument?
•     Is the pace too fast to old someone’s interest or convince a reader? Do I need to slow down and expand on any part?
•     Is the writing plausible, or believable? Are the reasons for actions and reactions clear and compelling?
•     Is the writing true in terms of history, science, mathematics, geography, contemporary social issues, etc.? Have I done the research that gives credence to what I’m saying?
•     Is my information in the best order?

Do I have too much information?

•     What parts are not needed - do not add to my point, theme, character, or plot? Can I delete them?
•     What is this piece of writing really about? Are there parts that are about something else? Can I cut them?
•     Which is the one best example or illustration?
•     Are there redundancies? Can I figure out the best way to say it once?
•     Have I contradicted myself anywhere?
•     Are there any places where the pace bogs down? Can I delete and compress information and speed things up?
•     Is there too much conversation? Too many details? Too much description? Have I explained something too thoroughly?
•     Is this a “bed-to-bed” memoir that describes every single event of one day? Can I focus on the important part of the experience and delete the rest?
•     Have I cut to the chase?

Questions about Leads

•     Does the lead engage readers and bring them right into the theme, purpose, tone, action, or the mind of the main character?
•     Does the lead give direction to the rest of the writing?
•     Does the lead set the tone or create the first impression I want for my readers?
•     Where does the piece really begin? Can I cut the first paragraph? The first two? The first page?



Questions about Conclusions

•     How do I want my readers to feel and think at the end? Will this conclusion do it?
•     Does my conclusion drop off and leave my reader wondering or confused?
•     Does my conclusion feel tacked on?
•     Does my conclusion go on and on?
•     Does my conclusion give readers a sense of closure but also invite them to want to read this writing again?

Questions About Titles

•     Is the imagery concrete? Can a reader see, hear, feel, smell, taste this?
•     Is my choice of words simple, clear, and direct?
•     Have I cluttered my writing with unnecessary adjectives and adverbs?
•     Have I used strong, precise verbs?
•     Have I used any of Macrorie’s Bad Words (really, very, so, all)?
•     Have I used any word(s) too often, especially in contiguous sentences?
•     Are my sentences clear, direct, and to the point?
•     Are my sentences active: I did this, not It was done?
•     Are any sentences too long and tangled? Too brief and choppy?
•     Have I used punctuation (: ; - …) that will give voice and meaning to my writing?
•     Have I paragraphed often enough to give a reader’s eyes some breaks?
•     Have I broken the flow of my piece by paragraphing too often?
•     Have I grouped together ideas related to each other?
•     Is my information for the reader from one idea to the next?
•     Is there a voice, an actor?
•     Does the voice stay the same-first-person participant (I did it) or third-person observer (he or she did it)?
•     Does the verb tense stay the same-present (it’s happening now or in general) or past (it happened before)?
•     Does the writing sound like literature - does it flow-when I read it aloud to myself?

Questions about Purpose
•     Does the writing answer the question, “So what?”
•     Do I have a big idea? Do I have enough specifics to support this theme, argument, or purpose?
•     Is the writing honest?
•     Will it make a reader think and feel?
•     Do I know what I’m talking about?
•     Will readers relate to the writing so strongly that I hold their attention the whole time?
Questions about Information
Is my information sufficient? Is it accurate?
•     Have I told enough? Have I explained each part well enough that a reader will know what I mean, every step of the way?
•     What’s the strongest, most satisfying part, and how can I build on it?
•     Have I described thoughts and feelings at the points where readers will wonder what I am, or what my main character is, thinking and feeling?
•     Have I embedded the context: told where, when, how, what, and with whom?
•     Have I described the scene with enough detail that a reader can see it happening - can envision people in action?
•     Did people talk? Have I directly quoted the words they said? Does it sound the way these people would speak to each other? Can a reader hear what they’re like?
•     Have I created questions in a reader’s mind about where the writing will lead?
•     Have I included specifics that reveal my character, myself, my subject, or my argument?
•     Is the pace too fast to old someone’s interest or convince a reader? Do I need to slow down and expand on any part?
•     Is the writing plausible, or believable? Are the reasons for actions and reactions clear and compelling?
•     Is the writing true in terms of history, science, mathematics, geography, contemporary social issues, etc.? Have I done the research that gives credence to what I’m saying?
•     Is my information in the best order?
Do I have too much information?
•     What parts are not needed - do not add to my point, theme, character, or plot? Can I delete them?
•     What is this piece of writing really about? Are there parts that are about something else? Can I cut them?
•     Which is the one best example or illustration?
•     Are there redundancies? Can I figure out the best way to say it once?
•     Have I contradicted myself anywhere?
•     Are there any places where the pace bogs down? Can I delete and compress information and speed things up?
•     Is there too much conversation? Too many details? Too much description? Have I explained something too thoroughly?
•     Is this a “bed-to-bed” memoir that describes every single event of one day? Can I focus on the important part of the experience and delete the rest?
•     Have I cut to the chase?
Questions about Leads
•     Does the lead engage readers and bring them right into the theme, purpose, tone, action, or the mind of the main character?
•     Does the lead give direction to the rest of the writing?
•     Does the lead set the tone or create the first impression I want for my readers?
•     Where does the piece really begin? Can I cut the first paragraph? The first two? The first page?
Questions about Conclusions
•     How do I want my readers to feel and think at the end? Will this conclusion do it?
•     Does my conclusion drop off and leave my reader wondering or confused?
•     Does my conclusion feel tacked on?
•     Does my conclusion go on and on?
•     Does my conclusion give readers a sense of closure but also invite them to want to read this writing again?
Questions About Titles
•     Is the imagery concrete? Can a reader see, hear, feel, smell, taste this?
•     Is my choice of words simple, clear, and direct?
•     Have I cluttered my writing with unnecessary adjectives and adverbs?
•     Have I used strong, precise verbs?
•     Have I used any of Macrorie’s Bad Words (really, very, so, all)?
•     Have I used any word(s) too often, especially in contiguous sentences?
•     Are my sentences clear, direct, and to the point?
•     Are my sentences active: I did this, not It was done?
•     Are any sentences too long and tangled? Too brief and choppy?
•     Have I used punctuation (: ; - …) that will give voice and meaning to my writing?
•     Have I paragraphed often enough to give a reader’s eyes some breaks?
•     Have I broken the flow of my piece by paragraphing too often?
•     Have I grouped together ideas related to each other?
•     Is my information for the reader from one idea to the next?
•     Is there a voice, an actor?
•     Does the voice stay the same-first-person participant (I did it) or third-person observer (he or she did it)?
•     Does the verb tense stay the same-present (it’s happening now or in general) or past (it happened before)?
•     Does the writing sound like literature - does it flow-when I read it aloud to myse
Return to 123HelpMe.com