Reader Response to Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

Reader Response to Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

Length: 997 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓


Personal response to Robinson Crusoe

 

"...I observe that the expectation of evil is more bitter than the suffering..."(p.181).

 

      Only after several readings of different portions of Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and several attempts at drafting a different type of paper, did I finally decide upon using this particular quotation. For me the best kind of writing is the one that does itself, and this quote is the basis for that kind of writing. All I have to do is hold the pen.

 

      My first recollection of being "locked into" fear (aside from the boogey man, ghosts and witches) was the first time I had to be absent from school for several days. I believe I was ill with a sore throat and fever. At the age of five or six, an hour often feels like a day, and a day like a week, so to be out of school for four days seemed quite a LONG time. Anyway, I remember my mother finally telling me I could go back to school the next morning. While part of me was happy and excited at the thought of seeing my friends and my teacher, the other part of me was terrified. What if when I got to my classroom no one talked to me? (because I hadn't been there). What if my teacher was mad at me? (because I hadn't been there). What if they all made fun of me? (because I hadn't been there). What if I didn't know any answers? (because I hadn't been there). I would die: I just knew I would. Well, after several hours of this kind of thinking along with the escalating of fear and anxiety that accompanied it, I really didn't have to worry about school the next day; I was making myself too sick to go back! The next morning after refusing to eat breakfast (which my mother said I was too excited to eat), I got dressed in my favorite outfit (red corduroy pants, checkered shirt- -with solid red scarf, red socks and white sneakers), and sat on the couch-waiting for my older sister, Susan, to finish getting ready to take me to school. The old fear-thoughts started again, and this time I had neither the comforts of my bedcovers nor of a day's respite.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Reader Response to Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe." 123HelpMe.com. 25 Jan 2020
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=15338>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Downfall of Man in Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe Essay

- I would like to comment about how Crusoe lived with himself after he became the master in a heirarchy where he was once the slave. He is so unhappy with his role of slave he takes the first opportunity given to him to escape. He also takes the first opportunity given to him to become the master of those left on the boat. This is unforgivable. He throws a man over board because he does not believe he can trust him, but he knows he can trust the first boat that sails his way. Does this sound funny to anyone else....   [tags: Defoe Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Free Essays
1369 words (3.9 pages)

Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe Essays

- Robinson Crusoe, written by Daniel Defoe, is a historical fiction novel that takes place in the 1600’s. Although written by Defoe, the story is told completely in the first person by the main character Robinson. It allows the reader to experience the full story from his perspective and know what is going through his mind during main events. The story occurs in a variety of places, including England, the Brazils, and a deserted island in the Atlantic Ocean. However, a majority of the book takes place on the deserted island that Robinson gets stranded on after a shipwreck....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe, Novel, Ibn Tufail]

Research Papers
992 words (2.8 pages)

Daniel Defoe 's Robinson Crusoe Essay

- Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe explores the concept of overcoming adversity to eventually gain a higher role of power. Robinson Crusoe was to lead a mundane life pursuing a career in law, had he followed his parents’ wishes and not been adamant about living a life at sea. However, going against his parents’ wants, he fashioned a life for his own at sea. Crusoe spends the majority of the novel building a life for himself that he would have not been able to have had he stayed in York. He became a plantation owner in Brasil, which is what lead to the shipwreck that caused him to become a castaway....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Daniel Defoe, Man Friday]

Research Papers
1143 words (3.3 pages)

Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe Essay example

- Robinson Crusoe Analysis As boys grow into men they go through a series of changes, leaving them doubting both themselves and their beliefs. One specific author who explores this is Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe. In this publication, Defoe writes about a man who emerges from a series of catastrophes as a symbol of man’s ability to survive the tests of nature. Because of the many hardships that Defoe encountered throughout his life, writing about a man whose thoughts and internal struggles mirrored his own helps to give the publication a sense of realism....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Daniel Defoe]

Research Papers
1172 words (3.3 pages)

Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe Essay

- “Bad things do happen in the world, like war, natural disasters, disease. But out of those situations always arise stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things.” Robinson Crusoe changes vastly, from a stubborn man to a prideful but knowledgeable one. While he accomplishes his journey of self-discovery, these are achieved by the several apparent forces. In the novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, the forces fear, natural disasters, and religion change Robinson Crusoe significantly. A principal force that changes Robinson Crusoe in the novel is fear....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Daniel Defoe, Man Friday]

Research Papers
789 words (2.3 pages)

Daniel Defoe 's Robinson Crusoe Essays

- Despite being the titular character, protagonist, and narrator of Daniel Defoe’s novel “Robinson Crusoe”, Robinson Crusoe is both a static and unlikeable character. Even after his incredibly journey through the course of the book, Crusoe shows limited to no signs of personal growth or development. It is difficult to sympathise with Crusoe even after all of the hardships he endured as he is only truly interested in furthering his own agenda. Throughout the novel Crusoe is constantly presented as a racist and self centered man....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Daniel Defoe, Man Friday]

Research Papers
725 words (2.1 pages)

Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe Essay

- Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe The balance between agency and the challenges to it proposed by unexplained or supernatural occurrences is of central importance in Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. Additionally, the question of human control over various surroundings seemingly develops commensurate to the title character’s increased reliance on and understanding of his faith. That particular conflict is a replication of the overall theme of the narrative — Crusoe’s finding increasing discomfort the more familiar he becomes with his environment....   [tags: Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Research Papers
1199 words (3.4 pages)

Reader Response Essay - On The Strong Breed

- Reader Response Essay - On The Strong Breed Reading Wole Soyinka’s Strong Breed, I get to wondering about disclosure and ritual, disclosure between characters and to audiences, rituals of drama and religion. As I read the play, I see ample signs that both Sunma and Eman know about the curse-binding ritual that is to take place before midnight. I see signs of Sunma’s more specific knowledge in her shunning of Ifada from the start of the play. She declares, “Get away, idiot” (853). From the start Sunma is agitated and hopes that she and Eman might get away for “only two days” (857), as long as the two of them might “watch the new year together--in some other place” (856)....   [tags: Reader Response Essays]

Research Papers
703 words (2 pages)

Personal Response to Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe Essay

- Defoe's novel, Robinson Crusoe relates one man's spiritual journey in search of self and his goal of setting things right and making amends. Finding the self may take a lifetime. It took twenty-eight years on the island for Robinson Crusoe to discover more about himself, and, of course, he had to wait that number of years before he could make up for past mistakes. However, we do not have an ocean preventing us from making amends, and if only readers were to open themselves to this book, for all its clumsiness, flat style and Eurocentricity, it can, by illustrating one man's life, illuminate ours....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Research Papers
1549 words (4.4 pages)

Book Review on Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe Essay

- Book Review on Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe The book I have chosen to do review on is "Robinson Crusoe". The author of the book is Daniel Defoe. The book was first published in 1719. The publishers that published the book were Penguin. Robinson Crusoe wanted to be sailor but his family wouldn't let him. When he got older he left and became a sailor. He went to South America and bought his own cotton farm. He had to make a voyage to Africa to get some slaves. On the way the ship got caught in a storm and it was destroyed....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Daniel Defoe Essays]

Free Essays
496 words (1.4 pages)

Related Searches

With that realization I threw up, all over myself and my chance to return to school. On the third morning that pattern failed. I really did recover, and my re-entry into first grade was in reality very pleasant. My friends crowded around me; my teacher greeted me warmly; and the most negative thing that occurred was that I forgot my milk and cookie money which I was told I could bring in the next day. This memory agrees intellectually and somatically with Crusoe's above-quoted observation.

 

      The application of this quotation is not limited in my experience to my early youth. I have been "locked into" fear and acted in direct opposition to it many a time and more often than not been surprised and rewarded by the results. My marital separation and subsequent divorce was such an experience. At the time of my separation, my son, Terence, was five years old (one of the first full-day kindergartners) and my daughter, Maryellen, was two and a half (a terrible toddler). While there had been arguments and cold-war silences and an ever- growing accumulation of heart hurts, major disappointments, and financial failures, there was also a desperate desire to keep the marriage together.

 

      We sought help through our minister and a marriage counselor. After several months of couple therapy, I realized that the only recourse was an end to the marriage. I was terrified. Wanting my freedom was one thing. Breaking up a home and taking the responsibility for raising two children alone was another. All the horror stories I had heard about `single parent' households flooded my head. Terence became a tragic juvenile statistic and Maryellen an unwed mother at best. These were two of my more positive visions of the future. How would I support them? Would we lose the house? I thought we would drown in my inadequacy. Only through listening to my own voice, sharing with friends and family and accepting their help and guidance was I able to act on what I knew to be the best for me, my children and even for my ex-husband. The night he came and packed his clothes to move into his parent's home came and went. I remember sitting on my couch after he had left with his father, saying to myself, "so this is it. Two children and seven years later, this is it." That was the deepest moment of sorrow I had and almost the last. I can suggest the significance of my loss of Billy by saying that the only time I noticed he was gone was when I set one less place at the supper table. In fact, life without Billy was delightfully unrestrained. We all ate together (no more arguments across the table); I had no more five-thirty deadlines; the bills were paid (unlike before); and there was much more laughter in our house. I joined Terence in attending school. I began taking college courses at Kingsborough with Maryellen attending the daycare center there. And even surviving turned out to flow more easily than I had feared. I was able to keep the house (through financial help from friends). The kids saw their father on weekends (much like before), and I was able to fill my time with my own pleasures. My decision to end my marriage opened the door for the life I enjoy today.

 

      Fear, or the expectation of failure or defeat does not guarantee its own fruition; non-action, tunnel vision, loss of choices or options do. The worst kind of decision is one made by indecision. Where there is faith, choice or hope, there is an alternative.
Return to 123HelpMe.com