Gilgamesh's Search

Gilgamesh's Search

Length: 404 words (1.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓
Gilgamesh's Search

The epic Gilgamesh is not a story of the journey to discover eternal life, but a story of a man, and "man's" quest to accept death. Thus the story in turn becomes a parody of life, for one does not begin to live, until he accepts his death. Gilgamesh as well deals with the disguised feelings of consolation and desolation, which are the two emotional components of existence according to Jesuit teaching.
To act in a similar behavior, and expect a different result, is the definition of insanity. What then could Gilgamesh be called but insane in denying his mortality? The arrogance! To think he was somehow special, and possessed the ability to perpetually everlasting eternal life. The initial premise for the Epic was a man searching for eternal life, because he was dissatisfied with what he had, and therefore his non-acceptance of existence. This translates almost into a feeling of contempt for life; to believe that what is now does not matter, because the only thing of importance is to be sure of an everlasting future. Gilgamesh was a man, enjoyed the pleasures of man, and would suffer the demise of man. It was his noncompliance to the universal validity of that statement, which was his nemesis. Death was his enemy, when in reality death is just a stage of life; it's called the end.
Consolation and desolation are taught by Jesuit teaching to be the two gravitational poles of life. Rendering everything in life either an extreme of which, or a medium of the two. Here's a hint, there is no consolation in searching for something that does not exist. Gilgamesh was doomed to suffer the curse of desolation from the beginning of the epic. To eventually become hopelessly desolate from the result of his hollow journey, with this extreme culminating at the very moment the serpent made lunch of his precious flower. However, as all things in life, the situation is circular and cyclical, nothing more nothing less, with nothing in particular any more important than the rest. Everything leads to something else, and for Gilgamesh one extreme led to another. Directly after the snake devoured his flower of youth his mortality finally hit home, and he was consoled by the once absent, then present acceptance of reality. A brief but impacting feeling of depression as well struck Gilgamesh, this but a moment before his reality realization.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Gilgamesh's Search." 123HelpMe.com. 23 Sep 2018
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=135599>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Search For Eternal Life In the Epic of Gilgamesh

- Grieving for days, lost in thoughts, and stricken with immense sadness and loss of direction, Gilgamesh laments for days over the loss of his friend Enkidu. Gilgamesh shouts aloud the following statement in regards to his current state of bereavement: “Me. Will I too not die like Enkidu. Sorrow has come into my belly. I fear death; I roam over the hills. I will seize the road; quickly I will go to the house of Utnapishtim, offspring of Ubaratutu” (Gardner Tablet IX 2-7). Gilgamesh so much feared death that he threw away his honor as a warrior in order to obtain immortality....   [tags: Epic of Gilgamesh Essays]

Research Papers
1847 words (5.3 pages)

Search for Immortality Depicted in The Epic of Gilgamesh and The Odyssey

- Through the many of mankind’s tales of adventure the search for immortality is a very common theme. Many heroes have made it the objective of their travels and adventures. This is no different in The Epic of Gilgamesh and The Odyssey. The heroes in both are tempted by the offer of immortality, however each of them turns it down for their own reasons. In The Odyssey, Odysseus rejects the offer of immortality from the goddess Calypso long after he discovers the true nature of the afterlife after travelling to Hades....   [tags: Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey]

Research Papers
858 words (2.5 pages)

Search for Immortality in the Epic of Gilgamesh Essay

- The Search for Immortality In The Epic of Gilgamesh the main character, Gilgamesh, is searching for immortality. This want is brought about by deep feelings held by Gilgamesh for his dead friend Enkidu. From this, Gilgamesh finds himself being scared of dying. This fear pushes Gilgamesh to search for the power of immortal life, which is believed to be held only by women because of the fact that they can reproduce. This takes him on a long and tiresome journey to a land where no mortal has gone before....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays]

Free Essays
725 words (2.1 pages)

Gilgamesh's Search Essay

- Gilgamesh's Search The epic Gilgamesh is not a story of the journey to discover eternal life, but a story of a man, and "man's" quest to accept death. Thus the story in turn becomes a parody of life, for one does not begin to live, until he accepts his death. Gilgamesh as well deals with the disguised feelings of consolation and desolation, which are the two emotional components of existence according to Jesuit teaching. To act in a similar behavior, and expect a different result, is the definition of insanity....   [tags: Free Essays]

Free Essays
404 words (1.2 pages)

Epic of Gilgamesh Essay - Desperate Search for Immortality

- Desperate Search for Immortality in the Epic of Gilgamesh The search for immortality seems to be an obsession for many men and women all throughout history. In the Epic of Gilgamesh a man investigates the possibility of immortality following the saddening death of his friend, his brother Enkidu. That man, Gilgamesh, feeling the fear of the possibility of his own mortality which was before unrealized before the death of Enkidu, searches for a way to preserve himself.             Is it truly that Gilgamesh searches for a physical immortality or more of a spiritual immortality....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays]

Free Essays
830 words (2.4 pages)

The Search for Destiny in The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, and The Aeneid

- The Search for Destiny in The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, and The Aeneid The search for destiny is reflected in the literary works such as "The Epic of Gilgamesh", Homer's "The Odyssey", and Virgil's "The Aeneid". The hero of each story travels to the land of the dead in order to satisfy their individual needs. And even though each one has a different motive for the journey, they share two things in common. First, each hero seeks to know something about his future or destiny. And second, their finds are not exactly what they were looking for....   [tags: Papers]

Research Papers
995 words (2.8 pages)

Gilgamesh: A Mythical Hero Essay

- From the beginning of time, mythology has appeared to be one key method of understanding life’s confusions and battles. Within these myths lies a hero. From myth to myth and story to story, heroes experience what may be called a struggle or a journey, which lays down their plot line. Bearing tremendous strength, talent, and significant admiration, a hero holds what is precious to their audience, heroism. Over time however, no matter the hero, the hero’s role remains indistinguishable and identical to the position of every other hero....   [tags: heroes, Gilgamesh, ]

Research Papers
855 words (2.4 pages)

The Friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu Essay

- The Epic of Gilgamesh is a historic story of the king of Uruk, Gilgamesh. The story depicts the short lived friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The story begins as Shamat the harlot seduces Enkidu and convinces him to go to the city of Uruk and meet Gilgamesh. From that moment on, the two were very close. They planned a trip to the forest of cedars to defeat the monster known as Humbaba so that Gilgamesh could show his power to the citizens of Uruk. However, Enkidu tried “vainly to dissuade” (18) Gilgamesh in going to the forest....   [tags: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Foster]

Research Papers
780 words (2.2 pages)

Essay about The Epic of Gilgamesh Story

- The king of Uruk, who lived around 2600 B.C.E, Gilgamesh, was one-third man and two-thirds god (Gilgamesh, 61). Known as present day Iraq, Mesopotamia was where the ancient sto-ry “The Epic of Gilgamesh” was originated. The story talked about Gilgamesh’s relationship be-tween his close companions. Meeting the immortal flood survivor and giving him eternal life was Gilgamesh's long journey. The Epic of Gilgamesh teaches about the Sumarian society. Located in the city of Uruk in Sumeria, the epic of Gilgamesh was an old describing king Gilgamesh’s reign around 26000 B.C.E....   [tags: mesopotamia, gilgamesh, sumarian society]

Research Papers
742 words (2.1 pages)

Death and Immortality in The Epic of Gilgamesh Essay

- Death and Immortality in The Epic of Gilgamesh The search for immortality has been a major concern for many men and women all throughout history. True love and immortality in life would be a dream come true to many. To spend time with a special someone, the person one feels closest to, and never have to say good-bye would greatly appeal to most people. But when death steps into the picture, even with all the pain and devastation, one starts to re-evaluate themselves. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh explores the possibility of immortality following the saddening death of his friend and brother, Enkidu....   [tags: The Epic of Gilgamesh]

Research Papers
1379 words (3.9 pages)

Depression is a result of desolation, and was as well a necessary step in Gilgamesh's spiritual metamorphosis. Almost as if Gilgamesh put his head down, depressed from the actions of the serpent, and then brought his head back up, in realization of the truth. Death is inevitable, and life is what you make of it. It was from this point on that Gilgamesh began "to live." He had conquered his demons, accepted his death, and began his journey home.
The beauty of the Epic Gilgamesh is that is applicable at so many levels, and is understood to mean so many things. However, the foremost issue made prevalent through this epic, was the need of man to accept his death. Let Gilgamesh be a general example to all, the journey is not easy, nor is it short, but it is well worth the trip.
Return to 123HelpMe.com