Essay on The Value of Life in Plato’s Cave and the Divided Lines

Essay on The Value of Life in Plato’s Cave and the Divided Lines

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Plato’s Cave and the Divided Lines
People must learn the value of life and the difference between living a dream and making your dreams come true. Being considered a father in western philosophy, Plato presented the Divided Line and Plato’s Cave to show the differences between the intelligent and visible world people live in; as the visible world being a world of one’s own reflections and shadowing’s, while the intelligent world is about the mind and thoughts. Plato uses a complex dialogue of Socrates to show, in a significant manner, that everything you see physically isn’t really what it seems. You must use the four segments in order to have full knowledge.
The four segments, which are labeled letters A through E, come from the two lines Socrates talked about in the dialogue of the Divided Line. The two first segments A and B are people considered passive and the lowest form of reality, as people go by simply what they see physically. The other segments labeled C, D, and E, are considered the highest form. People that belong in segments C-E, hypothesize everything they see then come up with their own conclusion based on the facts. As people living in the segments A and B are simply ways of saying when people are asleep while segments C-E are people who are open minded and see beyond the things people regularly see.
Plato then uses another dialogue, which was presented after his Divided Line, of Socrates speaking to Plato’s brother Glaucon to show how lack of education may affect us. Allegory of the Cave, also known as Plato’s Cave, begins with Socrates telling Plato’s brother about some cave used to keep people imprisoned since their childhood. They can’t see anything as they are restraint in such a way they can only se...


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... believe and laughed at the man that saw the outside world with his own eyes, such as the sun and moon. People that simply go by what they see tend to laugh at what is considered the truth because they don’t take the time to actually think and realize that, odds are, they are living in a dream world rather than making their dreams come true.
The prisoner that is free continues on with his now new free living life, it’s a mission for those who are enlightened to live happy and promote learning and knowledge, even to the ones that continue to refuse to have such idea. Those who go far beyond what is seen physically but sees what can’t be seen must continue to promote knowledge to other people. They must ascend to the highest form but must come back down to the cave, sharing ideas and live the dwellers and try to gear them to the highest level as well as yourself.

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