The Utopian Society By Sir Thomas More Essay

The Utopian Society By Sir Thomas More Essay

Length: 1767 words (5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Sir Thomas More composed the book Utopia in the year 1516. Utopia looks into many of the problems that faced England in the sixteenth-century and what a society would look like in order to relieve those complications. The Utopian society is brought about through conversations between the characters Thomas More, his friend Peter Giles, and the traveling philosopher Raphael Hythloday. Giles and More are quickly impressed by the level of travel that Hythloday had experienced; they want to know what he has seen and heard from other regions in regards to government and civilization. In More’s Utopia, we will uncover some of the problems that England was facing at the time and see where the Utopian commonwealth would do to alleviate said problems, speculate on what More – as the author – thought about the Utopian society, and determine what practices are attractive while determining which practices are deterring.
To begin, let’s look into one of the major factors that make Utopia so distinct from what Englishman considered normal at the time: the lack of private property. In Utopia, there is no private property and everything is communal. Hythloday states at the end of book one, “… wherever you have private property, and money is the measure of all things, it is hardly ever possible to find commonwealth to be just or prosperous” (p. 37). Hythloday goes on to state that a very few would control all things happy and that it would be divided amongst themselves. Even then though, they are still uneasy which leads to the masses being wretched in nature. More somewhat disagrees with the claims and holds a different stance on the issue. What we see here are classic arguments between Platonic thought and Aristotelian perspective. Hythloday eve...


... middle of paper ...


...unnoticed, is the equality of women being put forth by Hythloday. He explained how women were trained to fight and were encouraged to do so with their husbands. Not only the point of fighting, but the aspect of allowing female priests. Female priests are still not allowed within the Catholic Church.
All in all, More’s Utopia allows a broad audience to speculate the practices their culture performs. For More, this was the Roman Catholic Church and society of England in 1516. The book points out several aspects of life that would directly contradict the practices being taken place in More’s life. For Sir Thomas More these speculations appear to be more of wishful-thinking than possibility. Though he may be correct that many of the thoughts put forth in his book are unrealistic in nature, some perspectives were truly forward thinking – like woman’s rights for instance.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Thomas More's Utopia

- Thomas More’s Utopia is a work of ambiguous dualities that forces the reader to question More’s real view on the concept of a utopian society. However, evidence throughout the novel suggests that More did intend Utopia to be the “best state of the commonwealth.” The detailed description of Utopia acts as Mores mode of expressing his humanistic views, commenting on the fundamentals of human nature and the importance of reason and natural law, while gracefully combining the two seemingly conflicting ideals of communism and liberalism....   [tags: Philosophy, Utopian Society]

Strong Essays
1397 words (4 pages)

Thomas More's Utopia Essay

- Thomas More’s Utopia is a work of ambiguous dualities that forces the reader to question More’s real view on the concept of a utopian society. However, evidence throughout the novel suggests that More did intend Utopia to be the “best state of the commonwealth.” The detailed description of Utopia acts as Mores mode of expressing his humanistic views, commenting on the fundamentals of human nature and the importance of reason and natural law while gracefully combining the two seemingly conflicting ideals of communism and liberalism....   [tags: Book Analysis, Humanism, Utopian Society]

Strong Essays
1109 words (3.2 pages)

Thomas More and the Utopian Dream Essays

- More and the Utopian Dream   To some, it can be paradise, to someone else a heaven on earth, and still to others it can mean the Garden of Eden, the New Jerusalem, or even Biosphere 2. What we have come to know as "Utopia," or, "Any idealized place, state, or situation of perfection; any visionary scheme or system for an ideally perfect society" (Neufeldt 1470), is just a name that was coined for us by Sir Thomas More for an eternal idea. There were centuries of utopian ideas before More came up with his idea for Utopia, but he has become the father of the word's meaning....   [tags: Thomas More Utopia Philosophy Essays]

Strong Essays
2918 words (8.3 pages)

Sir Tomas More 's Utopia Essay

- Sir Tomas More’s Utopia indirectly criticizes fifteen hundredth European catholic society of corruption, violence, poverty and of inequality. As a lord chancellor to Henry VIII, Thomas More was well aware of these problems and wrote a satire to propose his awareness in a carful manner, as we can see his hesitation to publish the book on his letter to Peter Giles especially when he described his “two minds” (More, 8). To criticize the problems of his times on a safe platform, he created a fictional character Raphael Hythloday, who is wise and knowledgeable of new places from the sailing experience with Amerigo Vespucci....   [tags: Utopia, Thomas More, Utopia, Dystopia]

Strong Essays
1062 words (3 pages)

Utopia, by Thomas More: Your Wost Nightmare Essay

- Utopia is a brilliant novel written by Thomas More. The idea of a utopia seems impossible, how can anyone live in a perfect place when perfection is in the eyes of the beholder. The Utopia in this novel is nothing more than abundant of already established ideas therefore it can’t not truly be a Utopia. The abolition of private property is one of More's chief criticisms of Utopia; it seems to mimic the common understandings of communism, which Thomas More’s character Raphael has been accused of protecting not only by me, so this not a new concept....   [tags: Utopia, Thomas More]

Strong Essays
1418 words (4.1 pages)

Sir Thomas More 's Utopia Essay

- ... Along with this, More goes on to say that “it is a capital offense to make plans about public business outside of the senate or the popular assembly”(602), which prevents political parties or extra-institutional political entities from forming. Such political schisms would create an environment of disunity, which would detract from the communistic ideology of equality, as one group would set themselves against the other, and thus chaos would inevitably ensue. The Utopians ' obsession with uniformity, utility and humility reaches a climax in More 's description of their dress....   [tags: Utopia, Thomas More, Utopia, Politics]

Strong Essays
788 words (2.3 pages)

Sir Thomas More’s Utopia: An Alternative to European Life Essay examples

- Presented as a conversation between friends, Sir Thomas More’s Utopia offers an alternative to European life that is hopelessly unobtainable, but undeniably superior. Utopia is absolutely fiction, and yet it is written in a style that makes its content remarkably believable. More’s conversational attitude towards a serious and scholarly piece of thought makes his thesis at once obscure and obvious. He spends a majority of the narrative describing small, unconnected details of the lives of the Utopians, ignoring the lengthy scholastic explanations which are to be expected of a man of his education, and yet through the detail he reveals an expansive and original hypothesis....   [tags: Sir Thomas More, Utopia]

Strong Essays
1583 words (4.5 pages)

Essay on A Deconstruction Reading of Thomas More's Utopia

- A Deconstruction Reading of Thomas More's Utopia Thomas More's Utopia is the bastard child of European conventions and humanist ideals. Inspired by More's belief in the elevation of human manners, education, and morals, the text also concedes to the omnipresent traditions of European society. While More accepts parentage of the text, he distances himself from its radical notions and thinly veiled condemnation of Europe's establishment. Through the use of a benign narrator, Raphael Hythloday, and the assumption of a royalist persona by a character of his own name, More discloses the tale of the island of Utopia and its communist society....   [tags: Thomas More Utopia Essays]

Strong Essays
1800 words (5.1 pages)

Thomas More's Utopia as a Social Model Essays

- Thomas More's Utopia as a Social Model    In his famous work Utopia, Sir Thomas More describes the society and culture of an imaginary island on which all social ills have been cured. As in Plato's Republic, a work from which More drew while writing Utopia, More's work presents his ideas through a dialogue between two characters, Raphael Hythloday and More himself. Hythloday is a fictional character who describes his recent voyage to the paradisal island of Utopia. Throughout the work, Hythloday describes the laws, customs, system of government, and way of life that exist in Utopia to an incredulous and somewhat condescending More....   [tags: Thomas More Utopia]

Strong Essays
1248 words (3.6 pages)

The Imperfection Of Thomas More's Utopia Essay example

- A man named Speaker of Nonsense will clearly be disadvantaged in any debate. What kind of information or argument can be expected of such an individual. Can he explain a rational idea or form a logical conclusion. Is the authority of his discourse trustworthy. Or is he just a man with name and nature in perfect harmony. These are all questions that Thomas More leaves us asking of Raphael Hythloday, the garrulous sailor-philosopher who describes and extols the society of Utopia. From his memories of a five-year stay on the island, Raphael conjures up a thorough depiction of the sociopolitical practices of the Utopian way of life, which he proclaims "the happiest basis for a civilized communit...   [tags: More Utopia]

Strong Essays
1422 words (4.1 pages)