Essay on The United States Government : An Anti Federalist Dystopia

Essay on The United States Government : An Anti Federalist Dystopia

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Since its creation the United States government showned signs of possible disaster. When the founding fathers wrote the constitution they wrote it for the time they were in and the thing their people voiced was necessary for them. Like the Second Amendment that gave people the right to bear arms since that guns have gotten more lethal and people feel that they are still within their right to carry fully automatic assault rifles in the streets.The government is in danger because the government is more focused on the monetary benefits in its decision making and have lost sight of what is the essential which is making sure that the people are the primary object. Our society is approaching an anti federalist dystopia simply because of the two party system that has developed in government and hinders the progress of our nation. Important Bills and legislation have been halted and even terminated because the two sides could not come to a compromise. Thesis: The United States government inches ever closely to fully out diaseter because of the loss of connection between the government and the people then govern. The government no longer aims to assure the well being of the people but instead the financial gain they might. acquire
In the corrupt financing of political campaigns process of electing representative has been lost to large corporations and Super Pac’s and no longer care about the people that they were elected to representatives. Large corporations start super pac in which copious amounts of money can be donated to the camgian. The government can not put a stop to the amount of money donated to a campaigns because money is considered as speech and certain people believe that they can use money to convey their thoughts...


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... and ultimate result in a two party system which limits the number possible candidates . This is evident because everyone that did not vote for a candidate that won is not represented and sometimes it could be 49 percent of the popular vote. That 49 percent is stuck with a president that they didn 't vote for which could cause civil unrest. But if the alternative vote was adapted then people would be able to rate the candidates from the ones they agree with the most to the one they least agree with. With this change people will more accurately represented in the government. Campaign money would be limited to a set number for everyone which would make it possible for everyone to contribute to the candidate that they support but not infringing on other people’s freedom of speech. The government would be shaped around the people and representatives would

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