United States Foreign Affairs Essay

United States Foreign Affairs Essay

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The objective of the United States foreign policy, per President Barack Obama, is to do "everything we can to protect American citizens," and also states it is his highest priority.12 Since the Cold War, and particularly after the September 11 terrorist attacks, the United States has seriously set their sights on foreign affairs and spreading democracy for the betterment of the world. Most recently, the United States foreign affairs have involved political riots in Egypt and Libya, discontent with China’s human rights abuse, the War on Terror with Iraq and Afghanistan, and the threat of nuclear weapons in Iran and sanctions against.
Egypt's former president, Mubarak, was pressured to step down from power. With either decision – of Mubarak’s resignation or his maintenance of power – the cosmopolitan public was divided. Throughout this political struggle, the United States referred back to the Camp David Accords, ultimately concluding that although we are allies to Mubarak, we stayed neutral throughout this conflict. On the other hand, a portion of the American public desired to spread democracy to this conflicted country in its time of vulnerability. The United States made a wise decision by getting involved after the major storm had passed. Only after this revolution are we able to see a spark of democracy arising as political parties are a result. As Matt Bradley of The Wall Street Journal reports, political parties rising in Egypt include the Freedom and Justice Party, the 25th of January Party, and the Revolutionary Youth Party, among others.9 On Thursday, February 13, The United States was reported giving $150 million to Egypt. This substantial economic assistance is targeted to help the transition towards democracy, putting...


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...ils as Libya Splinters." Wall Street Journal 24 Feb 2011, Print.
8. Levinson, Charles. "In a Libyan Town, Elders Take Charge." Wall Street Journal 24 Feb 2011: A8. Print.
9. Bradley, Matt. "Political Parties Rise From Egypt's Revolution." Wall Street Journal 24 Feb 2011: A10. Print.
10. Bradley, Matt. "Political Parties Rise From Egypt's Revolution." Wall Street Journal 24 Feb 2011: A10. Print.
11. Smierciak, Sarah. "America's recurring folly from Afghanistan to Iraq and back again." (2011): n. pag. Web. 24 Feb 2011. .
12. "President Obama Speaks on the Turmoil in Libya: "This Violence Must Stop"." (2011): n. pag. Web. 24 Feb 2011. .

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