The United States And The Cuban Missile Crisis Essay

The United States And The Cuban Missile Crisis Essay

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Roger Donaldson’s film, Thirteen Days dramatizes the Kennedy administration reaction to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The film discusses a time when the United States had come close to a nuclear war with other nations. The film mainly focuses on showing the audience the United States perspective of the crisis. The Cuban Missile crisis was a thirteen-day long confrontation between the United States, Cuba, and the Soviet Union. This crisis started out when both the United States and the Soviet Union wanted to be seen as the most superior nation in the world. Therefore, both nations decided to use the technology they had in order to produce nuclear missiles and other weapons to show the globe how powerful they were as nations. The United States and the Soviet Union included other nations in their fight between one another; this is known as a proxy war. One of the countries that was exploited by the Soviet Union was Cuba. The country of Cuba was a strategic base for Soviet Union because of its geographic location near the United States and the fact it was run by communist. The Soviet Union was then able to place nuclear weapons on Cuban soil to create tension and fear in the United States. Due to the tension formed between the United States and the Soviet Union President Kennedy and his administration brainstormed different solutions to eliminate the missiles in Cuba as well as ease diplomatic relations. In the film President Kennedy is pressured to immediately strike Cuba. However, President Kennedy decided to create a naval blockade because it was the safest method in prevention of World War Three and the plan prevented Soviet ships carrying weapons to enter Cuba. The film Thirteen Days only depicts a small portion of what happened dur...


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...Accurate Where It Counts”). Kenny in the film is given a “big brother” role and is always advising President Kennedy in what actions he should take in order to keep the United States safe from the Soviet missiles. Also Thirteen Days does display a bias making it seem that the Soviet Union was the “bad guy” unwilling to cooperate with the United States to find a solution for the crisis. In numerous scenes in the film when the President Kennedy tries to communicate with Soviet Unions leader, Nikita Khrushchev he never replies back to any of President Kennedy’s telegrams or calls. Overall, I would give this film a six out of ten on historical accuracy because it does not include some of the most important details in the Thirteen Days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Also the film fails to include context for the viewer to fully wrap their head to the extent of this crisis.

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