Essay about Understanding the Debate Over the Origins of Life

Essay about Understanding the Debate Over the Origins of Life

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When addressing the origins of life, an unwavering dedication to the theories behind creationism & evolutionary and abiogenesis theories makes itself present. It is in this realm of debate, Darwin challenges the dogmatic approach to understanding made by religious doctrine with science and evolutionary precedent. The ongoing debate between evolutionary and abiogenesis biologists and religious leaders is the ultimate contest between science & pseudoscience. Evolutionary biology bases its claims behind the idea that a gene is a hereditary unit that can be passed generation to generation. Through this change in the genetic composition of a population during successive generations, natural selection acts upon the genetic variation of individual organisms and results in the development of new species. This gradual development of genetic makeup can be and has been observed in all known, living species on Earth and many that have become extinct. The antithetical understanding in the debate on the origin of life finds its roots in the scripture of ancient, religious texts. Although the claims vary in the multifarious religions that hold staunch endorsement in this belief, the core of the argument relies on the idea that an almighty being created the universe and all life within it. Intelligent design rejects the claim that life came to be through an undirected process such as natural selection and believes life was created with intent and purposeful scheme by an omnipotent deity. The case for both differs in almost every way; science and religion constantly fail to reconcile. Creationists find solace in the idea of a God that designed life in a precise manner, while evolutionists believe in the astounding beauty of evolutionary progress. ...


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... is far more compelling because, in context, all the evidence surrounding it that offer answers to evolutionary biology and cosmological origins have scientific and logical answers. If, through the experimental processes of science, we have been able to diagnose the causes of so many of the universe’s origins and following products, why would it be unreasonable to conclude that we couldn’t find a scientific solution to the origin of life? Science seeks to answer the questions of the universe, while creationism and religion lay under problems and fill in gaps of uncertainty with divine intervention. Science has disproved the vast majority of religious claims, so to assume that it couldn’t do the same for the origin of life would be asinine. Science constantly defeats pseudoscience with the use of logic and evidence and its dedication to finding substantial truth.



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